Author Topic: Killure, Macosquin, Colarine, Londonderry  (Read 224 times)

Offline MUSICGENES

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Killure, Macosquin, Colarine, Londonderry
« on: Thursday 14 October 21 11:51 BST (UK) »
I have done a lot of research to date.  Taken two DNA tests and these have helped link my GORDON surname to Rev. James Gordon of Rothiemay, son of Robert Gordon of Pitlurg Scotland.  I hired a genealogist in Northern Ireland who helped somewhat.  Based on this fellow's research he felt that my Gordons were the ones listed on the 1831 census of Northern Ireland living in Killure Macosquin.  My direct GORDON line immigrated to Philadelphia with his family in 1847 from Ireland.  I know that my Gordon's were weavers or worked in the linen industry.  I am trying to find out how many Presbyterian churches were in the area of Killure Macosquin from 1780 until 1847 when they came to the USA as they were very religious Presbyterians. My direct Ancestor was Abraham Gordon born in 1811 in Ireland.  So far there are no records to be found in Ireland for my Abraham.  Abraham married Sarah McFarland a very popular name in Derry and Coleraine area.  They had a son Robert in 1835, Robert's naturalization papers specifically state he was born in Coleraine, Ireland.  I also believe that Abraham and Sarah had a daughter Elizabeth in 1837.  Something happened to Sarah because Abraham arrives in Philadelphia with a wife named Mary Ann (she also refers to herself as Ann in Church Records) whose maiden name is Farley.  Abraham and Mary Ann had a son Joseph in 1842, son John in 1843 and a daughter Mary Ann in Jan. 1847 right before they sailed to Philadelphia Pennsylvania in the USA.  They arrived in Philadelphia 9 April 1847.  They had more children, not all lived to adulthood.  I am going to assume that Sarah died before 1840.  I believe that Abraham's father's name was James born in Ireland, but James's father was born in Scotland.  Abraham's mother is Mary Ann but I do not know her married name.  I have researched the church and city records at the Archives, Library, and Historical Society in Philadelphia and gotten lots of information but nothing that can link me back to Ireland. I need to verify Abraham's father's name and possibly this will lead me to his father's name in Scotland. 

If Abraham and Sarah had their son Robert in 1835 and he stated he was born in Coleraine Ireland would it be safe to assume that the GORDON's in Killure, Macosquin could be the correct Gordon's? 

Abraham had brothers, Robert, Joseph, Nathaniel, James, and a sister Ann (maybe Mary Ann but she went by Ann) who married Michael Leacock (Leacock is another popular name for the Coleraine area.  It seems that all Abraham's brothers and his sister Anne immigrated to Philadelphia.   

I would greatly appreciate any information that could help me figure out Abraham Gordon my great-great grandfather's parents and grandparents.

Many Thanks!
Ellie

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Killure, Macosquin, Colarine, Londonderry
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 14 October 21 17:51 BST (UK) »
I am trying to find out how many Presbyterian churches were in the area of Killure Macosquin from 1780 until 1847 when they came to the USA as they were very religious Presbyterians.
   

https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/irl/LDY/Macosquin
Select "Nearby churches" tab for map showing locations of churches. Markers are colour-coded. Presbyterian churches are blue. Selecting a marker shows name. Clicking on name gives access to more information about a church, if known.
Selecting "Historical Geography" from menu shows a list of townlands in Macosquin civil parish. Selecting Killure brings up a map of the townland.
 GENUKI is a volunteer website.
Cowban

Offline aghadowey

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Re: Killure, Macosquin, Colarine, Londonderry
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 14 October 21 22:38 BST (UK) »
https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/irl/LDY/Macosquin
Select "Nearby churches" tab for map showing locations of churches. Markers are colour-coded. Presbyterian churches are blue. Selecting a marker shows name. Clicking on name gives access to more information about a church, if known.
Selecting "Historical Geography" from menu shows a list of townlands in Macosquin civil parish. Selecting Killure brings up a map of the townland.
 GENUKI is a volunteer website.

A rather strange listing. I can't see Killaig Presbyterian Church mentioned at all yet it's not that far from Killure  :-\
Here's the location of Killure townland- https://www.townlands.ie/londonderry/coleraine/macosquin/drumcroon/killure/

Gordon isn't that common a surname in the Macosquin area. there were, however, 4 Gordon households in Killure in 1831. The 1831 census only lists head of household but that wouldn't be enough to assume a connection.
http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/c19/007246492/007246492_00249.pdf
http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/c19/007246492/007246492_00250.pdf

I checked early records for both Killaig & Crossgar Presbyterian churches without finding Gordons of Killure. However, Macosquin Presbyterian Church (also known locally as Englishtown) has baptisms starting in 1823 and there I found Gordons from Killure-
7 Mar.1826 Alex. Gordon, son of Leslie & Mary
7 Mar.1826 Nathaniel Gordon, illegitimate son of Nancy Arthur of Killure
14 Feb.1827 Jane Gordon, dau. of Joseph & Ellen of Ballywilliam
27 Mar.1827 Nancy Gordon, dau. of John & Mary
12 July 1829 Lydia Gordon, dau. of Leslie & Mary
28 Sept.1838 Nancy Gordon, dau. of Joseph & Ellen of Ballywilliam
27 Sept.1841 Martha & Ellen Gordon, daughters of James & Jane of Ballywilliam

1831 census shows a Leslie Gordon in Ballinteer, Macosquin and a Joseph Gordon in Ballywilliam

"Of Coleraine" could be the town itself or equally outside a bit (such as Macosquin) but I wouldn't rule out Portstewart or Portrush areas.
Away sorting out DNA matches... I may be gone for some time many years!


Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Killure, Macosquin, Colarine, Londonderry
« Reply #3 on: Friday 15 October 21 16:46 BST (UK) »
https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/irl/LDY/Macosquin
Select "Nearby churches" tab for map showing locations of churches. Markers are colour-coded. Presbyterian churches are blue. Selecting a marker shows name. Clicking on name gives access to more information about a church, if known.

 

A rather strange listing. I can't see Killaig Presbyterian Church mentioned at all yet it's not that far from Killure  :-\


Is it a different church to Killeague Presbyterian Church, Killeague Rd, Kileague? That church is marked on the map.
Cowban

Offline aghadowey

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Re: Killure, Macosquin, Colarine, Londonderry
« Reply #4 on: Friday 15 October 21 20:27 BST (UK) »
The church is Killaig, the road is Killeague and the townland is Killaig or Killeague   ;)

When I clicked on the link posted yesterday (https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/irl/LDY/Macosquin) and scrolled down it listed several Presbyterian churches but Killaig wasn't on that list (was still there when I drove by it tonight) it has a graveyard but that wasn't listed either (see below). In that same list Macosquin is 'Mocosquin.' There is a burial ground listed at Croaghan which is a bit puzzling and the 'old graveyard, Killeague' (Killaig Presbyterian Church) seems to have moved along the Kinneyglass Road or in a field off the road.  ::)
Away sorting out DNA matches... I may be gone for some time many years!

Offline aghadowey

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Re: Killure, Macosquin, Colarine, Londonderry
« Reply #5 on: Friday 15 October 21 20:33 BST (UK) »
There are Gordons of Killure mentioned here- James Gordon 1829 & William 1801. Unfortunately, the Wills don't survive.
http://www.billmacafee.com/wills/derrywills.pdf
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Offline MUSICGENES

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Re: Killure, Macosquin, Colarine, Londonderry
« Reply #6 on: Sunday 17 October 21 08:12 BST (UK) »
I greatly appreciate everyone's reply to my question. I am new to rootschat and have not yet figured out how to reply to each individual separately. Based on Abraham's brother Robert's will which he wrote on November 22nd, 1846 in Philadephia the siblings were as follows: 

Brother Abraham gets 30 pounds of silver to come to America.
Mrs. Nathaniel Gordon gets 25 dollars
Mrs. James Gordon gets 25 dollars
Sister Ann Leacock gets 25 dollars
Brother Joseph Gordon gets 100 dollars
Mrs. Joseph Gordon 25 dollars (crossed out with heavy lines)
The balance is given to Mother Mary Ann Gordon

The sister Ann Leacock married Michael Leacock in Ireland and a Michael Leacock is listed on the 1831 census living in the Townland of Dooleybeg (Dooey Beg according to Google). Michael Leacock died in 1862 while fighting in the US Civil War. According to his pension papers Ann stated they were married between 1827 and 1829 in Northern Ireland. Ann Gordon Leacock died in 1876. Ann and Michael arrived in the USA at the Philadelphia Port the 13 Apr 1840 with 3 children.
According to the 1860 Philadelphia city directory, Michael Leacock works as a cloth lapper.

I did find that James Gordon born in 1806 from Killure sailed from Londonderry to New Brunswick Canada in 1834. 

Robert Gordon's will was filed on January 7th, 1851. At the beginning of his Will, he states he bequeaths the following sums to his Dear Mother, Brothers, and Sisters (I only find one sister so sisters may just be standard wording - he does not mention a wife and the lawyer is the executor. 

Would the fact he gives money to each of the wives of brothers James and Nathaniel mean James and Nathaniel are deceased? Widow Gordon could be the wife of Robert. There is a Widow Gordon living in Killure in 1828 on the Tithe Returns for Macosquin and possibly this was the grandmother and she also came to the USA. There is also a Mrs. Gordon in Portstewart I found while searching records online but I forget where I found her. 

On Ancestry there are a good number of folks who have family trees but none have found out who Abraham's father was.  Some state he was the George Gordon 5th Duke https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Gordon,_5th_Duke_of_Gordon  but this is not possible.  A lot of folks copied this information into their trees. Some also have the father as James Joseph Gordon with no information attached. Not sure where they found this but it is possible the father of Abraham and his brothers and sister Ann was James Gordon. Some also have a John Gordon listed as a brother to Abraham and this is a possibility but so far no evidence that this is the case. On the 1851 census for Ireland, there is a John Gordon living in Ardmore, Limavady Co., Derry whose father was James and mother Mary Ann but then again no way to make the connection. 

Abraham is on 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880 USA census records, and all state that he was born in Ireland and his parents were born in Ireland.  Now, long-deceased relatives, I interviewed told me that the family was from Scotland and there was a well-known minister in the family.  Again there were a zillion ministers with the surname Gordon. 

For Killure I found the following Will information:

In 1801 Willís probated, William Gordon Killure Macosquin 1801 (possible this is Abraham's grandfather or his father's brother)

In 1829 James Gordon Killure Macosquin 1829  (possible this is Abraham's father)

McFarland and Farley seem to be popular names in the area during this time.  Abraham's first wife was Sarah McFarland based on his son Robert's citizenship papers (Robert was born in 1835 and his sister Elizabeth was born in 1837).  His second wife was Mary Ann Farley and their first living child was born in 1842 and his name was Joseph, their second child born in Ireland is my great grandfather John.  I can only guess that Sarah died in Ireland and Abraham remarried Mary Ann Farley. 

I did find that Killure was an active linen industrial site:

http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~catty/aghadowey/ag_linen.htm  Killure. A very old bleaching site. Pyke's survey in 1725 mentions that George Gregg has on this land "a Bleaching yard for whitening Linnen cloth." Alsop's survey in 1765 gives the tenant of Klillure as Mr. Robert Givvin, and notes that there is a bleach green on this farm. According to the O.S. it was occupied as a bleach green by the late Robert Kyle of Laurel Hill and ceased to work about 1807. At the time of the O.S. it had been converted to a flax mill and was occupied by John Lynn.

Abraham states he was a Weaver in Ireland.  His sister's husband Michael states he was a cloth lapper so I am just putting two and two together and guessing that the Killure, Macosquin, Portstewart areas etc. are where I should start looking for information first. 

I attached a copy of the report sent to me by the genealogist I hired in Northern Ireland. 

I would appreciate any information that can send me in the right direction to search.

Many Thanks!
Debi

Offline aghadowey

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Re: Killure, Macosquin, Colarine, Londonderry
« Reply #7 on: Sunday 17 October 21 10:38 BST (UK) »
Interesting but of research but I seem to have seen a few more baptisms in Macosquin Presbyterian Church records than they did  :-\ I went through the original records held by the church- perhaps they relied on microfilms (PRONI or Coleraine library).
My gut feeling is to rule out, for now at least, the Gordons of Lislea/Kilrea area. I would lean towards the Killure family (the Christian name Nathaniel makes this family a strong possibility) but Michael Leacock in Dooey Beg (1831 census) is other side of Coleraine but labourers often moved about for work and that could have been how he met Ann Gordon.
https://www.townlands.ie/londonderry/ne-liberties-of-coleraine/ballyaghran/portstewart/dooey-beg/
Aghadowey/Macosquin area was a centre of the linen industry and weavers were all over the countryside.
"Now, long-deceased relatives, I interviewed told me that the family was from Scotland and there was a well-known minister in the family." Most of the Presbyterians in this area were of Scottish descent but the Scottish connection could be back a few generations.
Will have a look through more of my files and see if I can find any clues.
Away sorting out DNA matches... I may be gone for some time many years!

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Killure, Macosquin, Colarine, Londonderry
« Reply #8 on: Sunday 17 October 21 16:37 BST (UK) »
I greatly appreciate everyone's reply to my question. I am new to rootschat and have not yet figured out how to reply to each individual separately. 

Robert Gordon's will was filed on January 7th, 1851. 

Would the fact he gives money to each of the wives of brothers James and Nathaniel mean James and Nathaniel are deceased?

You simply post replies on here as you have done. We receive email notifications that a new reply has been posted.
If you want to comment on the content of an individual reply you could either, for brevity, name the person who replied + the reply number so that readers can quickly find the reply, or quote relevant parts of it, as aghadowey and I did. There's no need to quote entire replies.

It's nice when people return to a topic to report on progress.
I sometimes receive an individual thanks by private message, usually when I've done a lot of research on a topic, or suggested new sources.

My inclination is that if money was left to wives of brothers it may indicate that those brothers weren't around to provide for their wives. However, if the brothers were dead would the women not be styled widows? My opinion is based on UK law. Several Acts of Parliament were passed in 2nd half of 19th century to increase property rights of married women. Previously, property of a wife belonged to her husband. You need to know American law about status of married women and their property if the beneficiaries resided there.   
Cowban