Author Topic: DNA ethnicity logic check / Unexpected result  (Read 6301 times)

Offline AndyH81

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Re: DNA ethnicity logic check / Unexpected result
« Reply #81 on: Saturday 15 January 22 16:35 GMT (UK) »
I've created a family tree based on the relationships I have been able to reconstruct from information I have been given by others or what was available online. I've also got some other information in a spreadsheet about connections related to the tree made via other sites, just not sure how these all fit together.

Dad spoke to my mum's older sister today and she said she knew nothing whatsoever about mum ever having had another child or that she had ever cheated. I got the sense she was completely blindsided by it all, so maybe there's no weight to the older sibling theory after all. She's not the kind of woman who would lie.

Offline mowsehowse

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Re: DNA ethnicity logic check / Unexpected result
« Reply #82 on: Saturday 15 January 22 16:51 GMT (UK) »
#81: I hope your Aunt's reaction brings you, (and your Dad,) some comfort Andy.
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Offline AndyH81

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Re: DNA ethnicity logic check / Unexpected result
« Reply #83 on: Saturday 15 January 22 18:38 GMT (UK) »
I guess I have mixed feelings about it all. On one hand, it's nice to know she wasn't keeping secrets; on the other hand, it means I haven't gotten any additional insight which I suppose I was secretly hoping for.

Offline Carmella

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Re: DNA ethnicity logic check / Unexpected result
« Reply #84 on: Monday 17 January 22 15:53 GMT (UK) »
So there is further option - you could try applying for your mother's official medical records...

I'm suggesting this but at the same time I don't want to raise your hopes because:

1 some medical records have not survived
2 some medical records remain closed for X years
3 some medical staff comments are very brief i.e. just a squiggle
4 reading a relatives medical records can be a traumatic experience...

On the other hand, from personal experience I know that medical records can provide information which cannot be found elsewehere. 

The cost was 30 in the 2010s but this may be different now and may vary across different parts of the UK. 


Offline Janethepain

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Re: DNA ethnicity logic check / Unexpected result
« Reply #85 on: Saturday 22 January 22 14:06 GMT (UK) »
Sorry to be late in on this, and I don't  know how accurate what I am going to say reflects the position throughout the rest of the UK, but as I worked until recently in a GP practice in Scotland for 25 years, ( I retired 31/12/2020), I am well aware that the paper records for a deceased patient were transferred back to CSA (Common Services Agency), shortly after their death, and similarly the online record was 'transferred out', back to CSA, when patients either left or died.  In the case of traditional/historical paper records, these records were only held on to (by CSA), for 3 years, and then destroyed. I would assume that the same would be likely for the online/electronic record too.

Paper record making within the practice ( ie clinical notes), stopped in my practice at the millenium (being replaced by entry into the online record for the patient), while incoming letters were scanned to the electronic patient record, starting in 2004.  Initially the letters were still filed in the patient record, but from about 2009 the original letters were shredded once a confirmed system backup had been verified. In the same way, the vast majority of paper based letters to the hospital, etc. disappeared, being relaced by electronic transfer more than a decade ago.

I hope this 'wee' summary might be useful and informative.  I don't know what happens at the hospital end, but I am sure they would have very similar procedures! Certainly, the vast majority of mail to the practice from secondary care (ie the hospital sector), has come in electronically for a number of years!

Jane


My point being that records may not be available for deceased patients for very long!
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Offline AndyH81

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Re: DNA ethnicity logic check / Unexpected result
« Reply #86 on: Saturday 22 January 22 17:13 GMT (UK) »
I already looked in to how I might get hold of her records, but I am legally unable to do so. There's very specific instances when you can, but I don't believe myself or anyone else in my family qualifies to do so based on what I had read.

Now that my father has spoken to my aunt, I think the idea of there being an older sibling is very unlikely now.

I've decided to focus my efforts on the possibility of finding out who the biological father is instead. I'm pretty sure I've narrowed it down to about 5 different men but in so far as I can currently tell, they're all dead.

Offline AndyH81

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Re: DNA ethnicity logic check / Unexpected result
« Reply #87 on: Monday 16 May 22 21:17 BST (UK) »
Ooooh, it's been a while, but I thought I'd come back to this again.

The girl who I initially matched to we now think is my 1st cousin once removed, as her mother has subsequently taken a test and has come back as an even closer match which would rather suggest her mother is my first cousin. In turn, her grandmother has now agreed to do a test to determine our relationship; as if she is my aunt, then we know my biological father must be one of her own brothers... it's just not easy to know which one. Several of them are dead, and the one who is alive would not be interested in finding out.

But what I wanted to check is if anyone knew much about the accuracy of MyHeritage's relationship suggestions as they offer a 'range', rather than a specific relationship? I'm going to use initials to protect identities, but the relationships I know about now are:

BC - first girl I matched with, we share 543 CMs. The suggestion is 1C1R, Great Niece, or 2nd Cousin

PW - mother of the girl I matched with, we share 1,130 CMs. The suggestion is 1C, Great Aunt, Great-grandmother or great-granddaughter.

Would there be any way for me to know definitively which of those suggestions is correct?

For PW I immediately ruled out her being my great-granddaughter or grandmother because I don't have kids and she and I are only about 12 years apart in age, so that would leave a cousin or a great-aunt. Is there any way to actually know?

When PW's mother takes a test: If she is my aunt: Would that give a 100% definitive result? Or would it still provide a range of suggestions?

This is all doing my head in after so many months. All I want is definitive answers.

Offline TonyV

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Re: DNA ethnicity logic check / Unexpected result
« Reply #88 on: Monday 16 May 22 22:06 BST (UK) »
All your match cM counts come within a range of values and cover more than one relationship. Have a look at this widely used chart linked below that will help. The chart shows the maximum, minimum and average cM figures for every kind of relationship based on data collected from thousands of cases. You will notice that ranges can overlap and that therefore a match cM might be from more than one kind of relationship. You need to eliminate the possibilities by the more usual methods e.g. age, location etc.

Look behind an Ancestry headline match for example and it shows all the possibilities with percentage probabilities. Doesn't mean they're right though!

Cheers
Tony

https://dnapainter.com/tools/sharedcmv4

Offline Nanna52

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Re: DNA ethnicity logic check / Unexpected result
« Reply #89 on: Monday 16 May 22 23:17 BST (UK) »
Just some food for thought.  My half first cousins match me at 572 cM and 483 cM.  Whilst at the low end it is possible that the mother could be a half sibling.
James -Victoria, Australia originally from Keynsham, Somerset.
Janes - Keynsham and Bristol area.
Heale/Hale - Keynsham, Somerset
Vincent - Illogan/Redruth, Cornwall.  Moved to Sculcoates, Yorkshire; Grass Valley, California; Timaru, New Zealand and Victoria, Australia.
Williams somewhere in Wales - he kept moving
Ellis - Anglesey

Gedmatch A327531