Author Topic: An address in Northallerton  (Read 443 times)

Offline Brie

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,075
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: An address in Northallerton
« Reply #18 on: Thursday 07 April 22 12:00 BST (UK) »
Although this is a modern document the maps and information might help you to get a feel of the place.

https://www.hambleton.gov.uk/downloads/file/1114/sd33-northallerton-yards-and-hidden-spaces-report---august-2010

Brie

Offline Ruskie

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 25,409
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: An address in Northallerton
« Reply #19 on: Thursday 07 April 22 12:47 BST (UK) »
Thatís really interesting Brie.  :)

Offline Brie

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,075
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: An address in Northallerton
« Reply #20 on: Thursday 07 April 22 12:58 BST (UK) »
There was a Post Office built on Friarage Street corner (1858) and then there's the later former Crown Post Office on the High Street as previously mentioned. That closed a few years ago and it now an empty building. The Post Office like so many others has moved to W. H. Smiths.

I will try and see if I can find any earlier references to Post Offices.

Brie

Offline Brie

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,075
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: An address in Northallerton
« Reply #21 on: Thursday 07 April 22 13:12 BST (UK) »
This should take you to the Report of General Board of Health 1849 for Northallerton

https://www.google.co.uk/books/edition/Public_Health_Act_Report_to_the_General/v2__sx0aCowC?hl=en&gbpv=1&dq=northallerton+1849&pg=PA12-IA1&printsec=frontcover

Interestingly there is a Mr Harrison who is Clerk to the Union. Given the professions of your Mr Harrisons could he be one of them?

Brie


Offline Ruskie

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 25,409
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: An address in Northallerton
« Reply #22 on: Thursday 07 April 22 13:15 BST (UK) »
You would think that the PO on the map posted by a Purdey at #12 would be the correct location -date of map is fairly contemporary with the Harrisonís residence there in 1851.

It would be interesting to know where the PO was in 1841. It seems odd that it would move from one side of the road to the other, but they must have had their reasons - larger premises perhaps?  :)

Offline Brie

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,075
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: An address in Northallerton
« Reply #23 on: Thursday 07 April 22 13:31 BST (UK) »
Sorry, I missed Purdey's reply. The 1849 report does mention a Post Office Yard but doesn't give a location. It may be that the Post Office didn't have a satisfactory "home" given that one was purpose built a few years later on Friarage Street.

Brie

Offline GillianF

  • RootsChat Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 146
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: An address in Northallerton
« Reply #24 on: Thursday 07 April 22 13:40 BST (UK) »
I stand in awe of your perseverance with this matter and it has really given me a feel for Northallerton (I'm a southerner!) and lots of documents and information to add in to what was looking a bit bare as a biography of Henry.

In the bankruptcy document I was led to here (above) Henry Harrison is referred to as an "........... Attorney at Law, Clerk to the Board of Guardians of the Northallerton Poor Law Union and Agent to an Assurance Office .........." so I believe the reference to Mr. Harrison in the 1849 General Health Board Report (above link) could well be my man.

Offline PurdeyB

  • RootsChat Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 142
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: An address in Northallerton
« Reply #25 on: Thursday 07 April 22 13:53 BST (UK) »
Sorry, I missed Purdey's reply. The 1849 report does mention a Post Office Yard but doesn't give a location. It may be that the Post Office didn't have a satisfactory "home" given that one was purpose built a few years later on Friarage Street.

Brie

As it says the corner of Friarage Street, do you think that could be the Hunt & Wrigley offices now? The Masons Arms would have been on the other corner.

Interesting that there were so many post offices but I suppose it was a time of rapid development for the postal services. As I was writing this, I wondered when the mail started moving by rail rather than coach. Presumably it would have gone from the goods yard near Low Gates.
Boutflower/Boutflour - Northumberland & County Durham
Branfoot - N Yorkshire, Northumberland & County Durham
Horwell - York, E Yorkshire & Lincolnshire
Bettley - N & W Yorkshire

Offline Brie

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,075
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: An address in Northallerton
« Reply #26 on: Thursday 07 April 22 14:16 BST (UK) »
PurdeyB, I think you would be correct about it being Hunt & Wrigley. As you say it can't be opposite as it's the pub but I suppose it could be a corner at the other end, one of which would be unrecognisable today but unlikely as away from the main street. I will have a look for a date stone.

I too was wondering about the post and "post offices". Given that stamps were introduced in the 1840s it presumably became a more generally accessible service. And as you say rail. The post probably switched from coaches to rail at some point in the first half of the 19th century. I was also wondering if earlier "post offices" were actually in the coaching houses.

Gillian F's ancestor wasn't a Post Master in 1841 as far as we know. Maybe it was a new post. Pure speculation though, next will have to read a history of the Post Office. That's the thing with this hobby, there's always new avenues to explore.  :)