Author Topic: Old German handwriting deciphering  (Read 112 times)

Offline vlotko

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Old German handwriting deciphering
« on: Wednesday 24 May 23 21:48 BST (UK) »
Hello! I am trying to understand what is written in this document and can only read "Apollonia geboren Kulwinska bei..." and then something about Kolomyia and Berezow nizny (town and village names). This is part of witness protocol about confirming nobility by one Berezowski family in Galicia in 1840. Would be very thankful for any help with reading of this.

Offline JustinL

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Re: Old German handwriting deciphering
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 25 May 23 07:42 BST (UK) »
... Apollonia geborenen Kulwinska bei deren
Trauung bin ich nicht zugegen gewesen, weil
solche in Kolomyia Stattgefunden hat, wohl
aber bei der Hochzeit welche in Berezow
nizny in dem Hause des Theodor Genik▀en
?

The witness had not been present at the couple's Trauung because it had taken place in Kolomyia, but was present at the Hochzeit in Berezow nizny in the house of Theodor Genik▀en?

To be honest, I have never seen a distinction made between the Trauung and the Hochzeit. I believe the Trauung was the actual wedding ceremony in the church, whereas the Hochzeit was the reception in the modern sense.

I can't make out Theodor's surname with great certainty.

Offline Karen McDonald

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Re: Old German handwriting deciphering
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 25 May 23 11:31 BST (UK) »
Hi,

I don't know what the situation was back then in that particular place, but in Germany (now) the Trauung is the official ceremony conducted by the Standesbeamter (registrar), i.e. the legal bit.  :)

A subsequent church ceremony (or other form of ceremony or celebratory gathering) is then usually referred to as the Hochzeit.

Some people who only have the legal ceremony (and nothing else) nevertheless refer to this as the Hochzeit. Which isn't actually correct, but what the heck.  ;D

This is all a bit confusing for us Brits, who have our wedding in either the register office or the church, but not both. 

@Justin: Good work! I wouldn't have got all that. The name is certainly interesting. The scribe often places the dot of an "i" a little to the right of the actual letter, but even taking that into account, I can't come up with an alternative that makes sense. ???
McDonald MacDonald M'Donald McGregor MacGregor M'Gregor Twilley Wells Fentiman Carrington Rowe Needham Mitchell Mackie Collingwood Fuller Maides Shilton Hagon Budd

Offline vlotko

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Re: Old German handwriting deciphering
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 25 May 23 22:17 BST (UK) »
... Apollonia geborenen Kulwinska bei deren
Trauung bin ich nicht zugegen gewesen, weil
solche in Kolomyia Stattgefunden hat, wohl
aber bei der Hochzeit welche in Berezow
nizny in dem Hause des Theodor Genik▀en
?

The witness had not been present at the couple's Trauung because it had taken place in Kolomyia, but was present at the Hochzeit in Berezow nizny in the house of Theodor Genik▀en?

To be honest, I have never seen a distinction made between the Trauung and the Hochzeit. I believe the Trauung was the actual wedding ceremony in the church, whereas the Hochzeit was the reception in the modern sense.

I can't make out Theodor's surname with great certainty.

Thank you very much, Justin! You can't imagine how pleased and thankful I am. I tried to decipher it for some time but wasn't able to go through it as I don't know German.

Surname is Genik Berezowski, the ending is on the next line. Yes, I agree that Trauung was wedding in the church and Hochzeit I think means wedding celebration\ritual in the groom's house. 

Thank you one more time!