Author Topic: Can an 'aunt' be a great-aunt in the 18th century?  (Read 240 times)

Offline Richard Knott

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,226
    • View Profile
Can an 'aunt' be a great-aunt in the 18th century?
« on: Monday 12 February 24 12:30 GMT (UK) »
Sarah Nott's will of 1757 mentions her sister, Elizabeth ABRAHAMS; her two daughters (Sarah, b1701 who married Chester Moor Hall in 1750; and Margaret, bc1705, who married Hugh Nightingale in 1721 (!)); and her nephew John Kennedy, to whom she left money to finish his apprenticeship.

John's apprenticeship papers (1745) say that he is being sponsored by his aunt, Mrs Sarah Nott, which fits well.

I cannot find Sarah's marriage to James Nott (c1677-1721) in about 1700 but, if she was an aunt, her maiden name would be Kennedy or Holbred as John Kennedy was born in 1732 to Charles (b1705) and Ann (nee Holbred) Kennedy.

All these baptisms and marriages took place in the SE corner of Essex (Foulness area).

My problem is that Sarah is at least 25 years older than her sibling (Charles or Ann); and I can't find her marriage to James Nott or her sister's marriage to a Mr Abrahams to conform a surname. Might she be one generation further removed from John Kennedy?

Richard



All the families I am researching are listed on the main page here:
www.64regencyancestors.com

Census: Crown Copyright www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline melba_schmelba

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,634
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Can an 'aunt' be a great-aunt in the 18th century?
« Reply #1 on: Monday 12 February 24 12:55 GMT (UK) »
I don't think people were always so specific about relationships in those days. Cousin could mean nephew/niece or something more distant. So yes, I am sure people also said aunt when we would specifically talk about a great aunt.

Online LizzieL

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 7,857
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Can an 'aunt' be a great-aunt in the 18th century?
« Reply #2 on: Monday 12 February 24 13:51 GMT (UK) »
There's a marriage between a John Abraham (of Dengie) and Elizabeth Hatts (of Bradwell, presumably Bradwell on sea) at Dengie on 26 Dec 1711. A possibility for Elizabeth Abrahams if she's Sarah's younger sister.
Berks / Oxon: Eltham, Annetts, Wiltshire (surname not county), Hawkins, Pembroke, Partridge
Dorset / Hants: Derham, Stride, Purkiss, Sibley
Yorkshire: Pottage, Carr, Blackburn, Depledge
Sussex: Goodyer, Christopher, Trevatt
Lanark: Scott (soldier went to Jersey CI)
Jersey: Fowler, Huelin, Scott

Online AlanBoyd

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,360
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Can an 'aunt' be a great-aunt in the 18th century?
« Reply #3 on: Monday 12 February 24 14:22 GMT (UK) »
Betsey Trotwood is David Copperfield's great-aunt, but he refers to her as his aunt.

I grew up calling my maternal great-aunt "Auntie Lily".
Boyd, Dove, Blakey, Burdon


Offline Richard Knott

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,226
    • View Profile
Re: Can an 'aunt' be a great-aunt in the 18th century?
« Reply #4 on: Monday 12 February 24 14:51 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for the suggestions.
There are also other possibilities for Elizabeth/ASBRAHAMS is her surname isn't limited to Holbred or Kennedy, so I think I'll have to take everything back a generation. Pity the James Nott/Sarah marriage isn't there.

Richard
All the families I am researching are listed on the main page here:
www.64regencyancestors.com

Census: Crown Copyright www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline lydiaann

  • RootsChat Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 741
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Can an 'aunt' be a great-aunt in the 18th century?
« Reply #5 on: Monday 12 February 24 15:26 GMT (UK) »
I am Auntie 'lydiaann' to my great-nieces and nephews.
Cravens of Wakefield, Alnwick, Banchory-Ternan
Houghtons and Harrises of Melbourne, Derbyshire
Taylors of Chadderton/Oldham, Lancashire
MacGillivrays of Mull
Macdonalds of Dundee

Offline amondg

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 6,219
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Can an 'aunt' be a great-aunt in the 18th century?
« Reply #6 on: Monday 12 February 24 17:09 GMT (UK) »
Have you considered that Elizabeth Abrahams may be her sister in law that she refers to as a sister.
They did like to complicate matters.

There is an Elizabeth Mot? married John Abrams 1699 in Prittlewell only a few miles from Foulness.

Offline Richard Knott

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,226
    • View Profile
Re: Can an 'aunt' be a great-aunt in the 18th century?
« Reply #7 on: Monday 12 February 24 17:16 GMT (UK) »
A good suggestion re the use of sister for sister-in-law (which I have seen before) but, unfortunately, that particular Elizabeth died in 1701 and John Abrams remarried in 1702.

Richard
All the families I am researching are listed on the main page here:
www.64regencyancestors.com

Census: Crown Copyright www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline amondg

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 6,219
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Can an 'aunt' be a great-aunt in the 18th century?
« Reply #8 on: Monday 12 February 24 17:22 GMT (UK) »
Sorry about that.