Author Topic: Wills  (Read 459 times)

Offline shume

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Wills
« on: Tuesday 02 April 24 11:32 BST (UK) »
Am not sure if this is the correct board but here goes!
I have a will dated 1830 in which the deceased leaves income from property to his wife, 3 daughters  (possibly unmarried) and eldest son. The eldest son is also an executor.
The youngest son, born 1819,from whom we are descended, is not mentioned at all.

Can anyone explain if this was a common occurence or deliberate for some reason.

Many thanks
HUME: Fermanagh, Donegal,Sligo,Australia
PASFIELD: Essex, London
SHAW/STANLEY: Co Waterford,Ireland, Australia

Online ShaunJ

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Re: Wills
« Reply #1 on: Tuesday 02 April 24 11:46 BST (UK) »
You say who is to receive the property income (is that for life?) but you don't say who ultimately inherits the property or anything else in the residual estate. Is the will online? If so perhaps you could post a link.
UK Census info. Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline Milliepede

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Re: Wills
« Reply #2 on: Tuesday 02 April 24 16:09 BST (UK) »
Hard to say because it's up to you who you leave things to in your will.

The younger son could have been out of favour or well off enough not to need anything.

Just noticed the dates so the younger wasn't even an adult at the time - were the daughters children or adults?
Hinchliffe - Huddersfield Wiltshire
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Offline zetlander

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Re: Wills
« Reply #3 on: Tuesday 02 April 24 21:08 BST (UK) »
Wills are funny things!
Recall a solicitor coming to my home so my grandfather could make a will - an aunt was there to act as witness - when grandfather died in 1970 no sign of a will - officially he died intestate.
Some years after he died I contacted the firm of solicitors and they confirmed that he had made a will but they didn't have a copy !!


Offline Spelk

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Re: Wills
« Reply #4 on: Tuesday 02 April 24 22:50 BST (UK) »
In general I have found that all offspring would be mentioned in a Will even if they got very little or nothing. This ensured that a child who was not mentioned could not claim that the person making the Will was not mentally fit and had accidentally forgotten a child.
The expression “cut off with a shilling” comes to mind. 

Offline bbart

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Re: Wills
« Reply #5 on: Wednesday 03 April 24 03:07 BST (UK) »
Do you know the ages of the daughters in 1819?  Is there a possibility that the 1819 son was actually an out of wedlock grandson?