Author Topic: Question mark?  (Read 893 times)

Offline GR2

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Re: Question mark?
« Reply #9 on: Tuesday 02 April 24 20:20 BST (UK) »
Is it the final r in an abbreviated word? In the way that minister, for example, is often abbreviated to minr.

Offline bbart

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Re: Question mark?
« Reply #10 on: Tuesday 02 April 24 22:44 BST (UK) »
Is it the final r in an abbreviated word? In the way that minister, for example, is often abbreviated to minr.

i believe so... the attached clip is from the same page of baptisms of Shifnal, Shropshire.
The writer always uses it for female children: daughtE, and most of the time for December: DecE.
I believe it is a place name, and looking at a modern map, just south there is a "Manor"; perhaps the spelling changed over time?

Offline Rena

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Re: Question mark?
« Reply #11 on: Tuesday 02 April 24 23:26 BST (UK) »
I'm glad somebody has brains - I was puzzling over the scribble for ages trying to find a similar image.

So "congratulations all round".
Aberdeen: Findlay-Shirras,McCarthy: MidLothian: Mason,Telford,Darling,Cruikshanks,Bennett,Sime, Bell: Lanarks:Crum, Brown, MacKenzie,Cameron, Glen, Millar; Ross: Urray:Mackenzie:  Moray: Findlay; Marshall/Marischell: Perthshire: Brown Ferguson: Wales: McCarthy, Thomas: England: Almond, Askin, Dodson, Well(es). Harrison, Maw, McCarthy, Munford, Pye, Shearing, Smith, Smythe, Speight, Strike, Wallis/Wallace, Ward, Wells;Germany: Flamme,Ehlers, Bielstein, Germer, Mohlm, Reupke

Offline Shrop63

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Re: Question mark?
« Reply #12 on: Wednesday 03 April 24 09:41 BST (UK) »
Is it the final r in an abbreviated word? In the way that minister, for example, is often abbreviated to minr.

i believe so... the attached clip is from the same page of baptisms of Shifnal, Shropshire.
The writer always uses it for female children: daughtE, and most of the time for December: DecE.
I believe it is a place name, and looking at a modern map, just south there is a "Manor"; perhaps the spelling changed over time?
There was/is a place called Mannerley Lane which might help a lot with my research, but i thought Mannerley always came under Wellington parish, not Shifnal
Parton
Poole
Clare
Jones
Ellis




Vaughan
Watkiss


Offline Shrop63

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Re: Question mark?
« Reply #13 on: Wednesday 03 April 24 09:42 BST (UK) »
I'm glad somebody has brains - I was puzzling over the scribble for ages trying to find a similar image.

So "congratulations all round".
I wouldnt go that far Rena! Hope you well Shrop63
Parton
Poole
Clare
Jones
Ellis




Vaughan
Watkiss

Online emeltom

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Re: Question mark?
« Reply #14 on: Wednesday 03 April 24 09:44 BST (UK) »
It may well mean that she was from Mannerly but was having the child baptised in Shifnal. Maybe something to do with the child's illegitimacy
Smith Tiplady Boulton Branthwaite King Miller Woolfall Bretherton Archer and many more

Offline Shrop63

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Re: Question mark?
« Reply #15 on: Wednesday 03 April 24 10:52 BST (UK) »
It may well mean that she was from Mannerly but was having the child baptised in Shifnal. Maybe something to do with the child's illegitimacy
Could well be, its very close to the border so to speak. Mannerley is the only thing that fits really. Pretty sure John was born in Dec 1720 and his parents married in Jan 1721 but still called "base" poor lad
Parton
Poole
Clare
Jones
Ellis




Vaughan
Watkiss

Offline arthurk

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Re: Question mark?
« Reply #16 on: Wednesday 03 April 24 11:35 BST (UK) »
Could well be, its very close to the border so to speak. Mannerley is the only thing that fits really. Pretty sure John was born in Dec 1720 and his parents married in Jan 1721 but still called "base" poor lad

I don't know Shifnal and its surrounding area, so can't comment on whether Manner or Mannerley is more likely**. However, on this page in the register I see that in nearly all cases this mark is used as an abbreviation for '-er' (farmer, weaver, December etc). In the bottom two entries on the page it comes after 'Jan' and can only mean January.

Remember that New Year's Day then was 25 March, so December 1721 was immediately followed by January 1721. According to the register John was born on 27 Dec 1721, and baptised on 1 Jan 1721, but in the modern calendar that would be 1 Jan 1722. To avoid confusion the conventional way to write it now is 1721/22.

**Added:
If the marriage is the one on 15 Jan 1721/22 (William Marting and Sarah Ellis), then they are both said to be 'of this parish'.
Researching among others:
Bartle, Bilton, Bingley, Campbell, Craven, Emmott, Harcourt, Hirst, Kellet(t), Kennedy,
Meaburn, Mennile/Meynell, Metcalf(e), Palliser, Robinson, Rutter, Shipley, Stow, Wilkinson

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Offline Bookbox

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Re: Question mark?
« Reply #17 on: Wednesday 03 April 24 11:53 BST (UK) »
As has been suggested above, it is simply an -er or -or suspension at the end of the word. Mannerly would not normally be written like that.

Iím sure bbart has the answer (reply #10):

I believe it is a place name, and looking at a modern map, just south there is a "Manor"; perhaps the spelling changed over time?

In the 1720s, she would probably have been living as a tenant in one of the properties owned by Shifnal Manor.