Author Topic: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.  (Read 1175 times)

Offline Andrew Tarr

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #27 on: Tuesday 11 June 24 13:46 BST (UK) »
In both Google Maps and Apple Maps, Crécy appears without a cedilla. As a control I checked Alençon – it does have a cedilla in these maps.

Despite its reputation for severe reactionism, perhaps L'Académie Française permitted some revisions in the last few decades ? I was taught to use clef for 'key', but that now seems to be universally clé.
Tarr, Tydeman, Liversidge, Bartlett, Young

Offline DianaCanada

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #28 on: Tuesday 11 June 24 18:55 BST (UK) »
My late father-in-law was a Canadian soldier during WW2 (as was my father) and was one of the troops who landed on Juno beach in Normandy on June 6, 1944.  He had recently turned 22. I have just been reading his memoir and it includes a moving section about his war experience. His older brother was in the same battery and they crossed the Channel together and landed on Juno Beach in the same landing craft.  His brother was a tank driver and Merton was a wireless operator, but he was not doing that on June 6th.  He describes the landing as HELL and the carnage as horrific.  That night, after advancing, the soldiers took turns manning machine guns, and trying to sleep between shifts.

Farther on, as they moved through Normandy, friendly fire from Lancaster bombers killed scores of men.  His regiment moved through Normandy and into other parts of France, then into Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany , Netherlands again and Germany again.  His regiment was one of the Canadian forces that liberated the Netherlands.  On his 23rd birthday in 1945 he received orders, as the wireless operator, for the Troop to cease fire as hostilities in Europe were ended where they were.

As he wrote in his memoir, “we must always remember and honour those of our comrades who made the supreme sacrifice in hopes of a saner world.  Then there are those who returned home wounded and many destined to suffer for the rest of their days.  There are many thousands who returned without visible injuries but who have 65 or more years of memories to contend with.  That is why many of them do not wish to talk about the war.  They try to forget the bad experiences and concentrate on the good days and good friends.”

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #29 on: Tuesday 11 June 24 21:10 BST (UK) »
Well as you say Andrew ,it is almost sixty years since the little books were published and rules of grammar and spelling could well have changed.
I don’t remember ever having to write Crecy but we did garçon —- ooo! one has popped up !
So perhaps dropped for some words but kept for others .
Thanks ,I did not mean to hijack the important topic of DDay.

What a wonderful record Diana, and it is only one of so very many .
You must be very proud ,they deserve that recognition.Thanks.

My  daughter and  son in law will be back soon from Normandy, they go every year.

My eldest son’s birthday tomorrow,he will be 67, such a charming little boy and his card has Christopher Robin playing “ Poo sticks” which we did often when he was small, oh happy days.
Viktoria.

Offline jnomad

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #30 on: Tuesday 11 June 24 21:54 BST (UK) »
Crecy (can’t find a way to do the accent), without cedilla, is fine and so far as I know has always been. Andrew Tarr gave the rule. If “c” would be soft anyway because of what follows it, it doesn’t need a cedilla. N’est-ce pas?


Offline Andrew Tarr

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #31 on: Tuesday 11 June 24 23:13 BST (UK) »
Andrew Tarr gave the rule. If “c” would be soft anyway because of what follows it, it doesn’t need a cedilla. N’est-ce pas?
Oui - c'est ça !  :D
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Offline Erato

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #32 on: Wednesday 12 June 24 00:05 BST (UK) »
"can’t find a way to do the accent"

Use the Character Map.  It gives you every accent, symbol and foreign alphabet you could ever want.


¼úñœЖ؈♫♀↑Ω

Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr, Davis

Offline Rena

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #33 on: Wednesday 12 June 24 02:21 BST (UK) »
My first job was as a receptionist for a large company. My boss was the doorman.  His title was "Sergeant" and he wore a uniform.  Many large companies employed "sergeants" as doormen, my father explained to me that the government had encouraged companies to engage ex servicemen as doormen who might not have any skills, such as engineering, plumbing, etc.   I earned an extra 2s/6d per week for use of my bicycle when I delivered messages to local companies sited around the town centre.

I remember being extremely hungry on odd occasions throughout the war.  All food was rationed and you couldn't buy any food without producing your ration book so that the shop assistant could cut one of the weekly coupons out of it.  "A typical person's weekly ration allowed then was: 1 egg, 2 ounces each of tea and butter, an ounce of cheese, eight ounces of sugar, four ounces of bacon and four ounces of margarine."

In 1939, we were importing 55 million tonnes of our food each year from across the globe. As German submarines took to the seas and torpedoed supply ships, the trade routes we relied on were not safe, and it was no longer guaranteed that these imports would safely reach British ports.  (RIP all the merchant seafarers in my family who sailed from Leith docks).

The war plus bad weather on the European mainland meant that the Dutch were starving and in 1944 the British Wartime government, led by Winston Churchill, decided to share the food we'd harvested with the starving Dutch civilians, who were still under the boot of the Nazi army - who were also hungry and welcomed the  food being parachuted down.. 
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