Author Topic: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.  (Read 1179 times)

Online BumbleB

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #9 on: Thursday 06 June 24 15:07 BST (UK) »
I didn't have any close relatives who fought in WWII, but my father did do his bit - he was involved in the construction of Spitfires, at Sealand, outside Chester.  He did tell me that occasionally, to keep them all on their toes whilst working, they would be invited on a test flight!

My grandfather died in WWI and is commemorated at Thiepval as he has no known resting place.
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Offline SouthseaSteel

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #10 on: Thursday 06 June 24 16:52 BST (UK) »

Bang on Biggles!!  The greatest generation

Online Biggles50

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #11 on: Thursday 06 June 24 17:08 BST (UK) »
I didn't have any close relatives who fought in WWII, but my father did do his bit - he was involved in the construction of Spitfires, at Sealand, outside Chester.  He did tell me that occasionally, to keep them all on their toes whilst working, they would be invited on a test flight!

My grandfather died in WWI and is commemorated at Thiepval as he has no known resting place.

Then my Dad helped to protect your Dad.

My Dad spent the War at Saighten Camp outside Chester on the Anti Aircraft Batteries.

Online heywood

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #12 on: Thursday 06 June 24 17:25 BST (UK) »
There is a wonderful poem on X (or Twitter ) and Facebook at the moment by Brian Bilston. It is called  ‘Queueing for an Ice Cream’.
It sums up all our fathers and grandfathers who were so reticent about the war.
I am not sure if I could post it on here so hope that those who can access it do so.
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Offline Shropshire Lass

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #13 on: Friday 07 June 24 13:07 BST (UK) »
While the D-Day veterans should be honoured and not forgotten, it's a shame that the men who stormed the beaches in Italy and created the First Front have been forgotten.  They had fought desperate battles up through Italy in appalling conditions while the preparations for the Second Front in France were going on and were keeping over 60 enemy divisions busy, leaving the Germans with only 33 divisions to try to repel the D-Day landings.

Without their heroic service, the result of D-Day could have been very different.
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Offline Viktoria

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #14 on: Saturday 08 June 24 09:00 BST (UK) »
Yes , and I seem to remember from a T.V. documentary that Mark  Clark
( U.S) was determined to be the first to Rome and his sort of stalling actions sacrificed many divisions .
It was a truly appalling egotistical tactic,costing many unnecessary deaths.

We must also remember The Highland Division  ,that was on the lower end of the front,( N- S)  sideways on to block German troops from getting behind our troops.They suffered very high casualties, I remember another very interesting documentary about that .

Without checking I am a bit uncertain if that was the D Day landings or our retreat earlier when all the little boats crossed The Channel to rescue our troops stranded on the sands, with German guns pounding the beaches .

Many acts of bravery , and by ordinary chaps and lads who have been very modest about their part in it all.
All the more commendable .
Viktoria.


Offline Viktoria

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #15 on: Sunday 09 June 24 18:09 BST (UK) »
At Church this morning we remembered those lost in the amazing D.Day landings .
One lady’s husband was there on that day, ,he died a little while ago aged in his nineties.
She brought quite a few artefacts ,one being a little sealed bottled of sand from the beach where his company landed.
Photographs of the French people who were so overjoyed to see British Troops and whom he later visited on a return trip organised by his children for his 80 th Birthday.
The sand was a little gift from one family he had known ,given on his return visit many years later.

It was very moving and that modest man never boasted ,it was his family who gave us the information.

Our Ladies’ Afternoon Tea yesterday was lovely,so many lovely cakes baked and donated .
So we were eating cake again after morning service and quite a few people called in ( to use the loo!) so they got some too.

It was The Women’s Cycle race through Ramsbottom today ,they whizzed along Bridge Street , sounding like a big swarm of angry bees.- then would cross Bolton St,THEN—— The Rake! - phew, that is so very steep one in six or so —— old measurements!
It took me back to Belgium ,most Sundays there were races,mostly local .
Tom Simpson who died in The Tour de France on Mont Ventoux with his lovely wife and little girls was a near neighbour when we lived in Gent ,Belgium.

A very cold rainy day today , not like June at all.
Not sure when son will arrive back so a slow cooker chicken and mushroom casserole cooking.
Look after yourselves folks .
Thanks for the news.
Viktoria.


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Offline susieroe

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #16 on: Monday 10 June 24 09:17 BST (UK) »
A tiny thing but I thought quite apt:

I get many self-setting flowers on my front garden, among which are usually a few poppies. They've always been pale pink, but on Saturday, coming back from the shop, I  see that one has bloomed a glorious double crimson red. So that's my garden's contribution to remembrance of this last week's events. Hopefully, it's seeds will have enough red genes to come true next year.   
Roe,Wells, Bent, Kemp, Weston
Bruin, Gillam, Hurd/Heard, Timson, All in Leicestershire. Keats (Kates)

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Offline Watson

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Re: Least we forget, 6th June 1944.
« Reply #17 on: Monday 10 June 24 09:54 BST (UK) »
I am proud of my Dad's service in the R.A.F..  A school teacher, he was called up about 1942 and for some time worked in the Operations Room at Tangmere. Later, he went to Normandy soon after D-Day.  I believe he was a radio operator, but I don't know too much about it.  A relative told me that he was sometimes the last contact with the world which pilots had after being shot down, and he found this distressing. He used to tell a story about being chased across a field by a German aeroplane.  Desperate to escape, he dived down a "fox-hole". Unfortunately, he jumped into it with such alacrity that he broke another man's leg.