Author Topic: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member  (Read 11977 times)

Offline ThrelfallYorky

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #27 on: Monday 10 September 18 16:32 BST (UK) »
I discovered relatives listed as "boarder" and "visitor" on one census --- by tracing them on earlier and later censuses including in different households, in most cases the relationship revealed itself. Happy hunting, and welcome.
Threlfall (Southport), Isherwood (lancs & Canada), Newbould + Topliss(Derby), Keating & Cummins (Ireland + lancs), Fisher, Strong& Casson (all Cumberland) & Downie & Bowie, Linlithgow area Scotland . Also interested in Leigh& Burrows,(Lancashire) Griffiths (Shropshire & lancs), Leaver (Lancs/Yorks) & Anderson(Cumberland and very elusive)

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Offline BushInn1746

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Re: Query - Border Head - England & Wales Census 1881
« Reply #28 on: Monday 10 September 18 19:47 BST (UK) »

England Wales Census 1881

Under the occupants of a house besides the Head and the Wife of the head (property owners?)
There were two other entries entitled  “Boarder Head”.  In each instance both parties had a wife and one included a son (separate family units?).

What does the term “Boarder Head” mean, please.   Does it mean the “Head” and his wife owned a property containing two extra units occupied separately by “Boarder Heads”  or some other explanation?    There was nothing on the record to explain the possibility of extra separate dwelling space within the residence.   Thanks for any explanations offered.  Regards – Dinny.         

Hello

Just one small point, the England & Wales Census were originally made of everybody, regardless of whether they owned or rented the property in which they lived. For example, even if it does say "Owner of Houses" or "Owner of 215 acres" against their Occupation, phrases like that do not necessarily mean they owned the property in which they lived at (in the Census).

Many who owned property, have said nothing about it, but given some other Occupation.

The purpose of that Census was not property Ownership or Tenure.

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Now, Boarder Head, above your question, is your answer.

In the property there was the "Head" of his or her house/household, showing as the "Head".

a) Then in the same property, if you had Boarders, the Border/s relationship to the "Border Head" is given.

b) Where there is more than one Boarder, but none of the Boarders were related to each other, this suggests that there should be no "Boarder Head" listed.

ADDED to b): Of course as previously discussed, one or more of the child, juvenile or young person or adult Boarder/s might also be related to the main "Head".


Somewhere, there should be Instructions to Census Enumerators or those responsible.

Mark
"George HOOD of Selby" Before 1812?

Born about 1785 (Yorkshire per 1841 Census)

Married Sarah RUSSELL at Selby 1815 newspaper - "both of that place".

Buried in the Quaker Burial Ground at Selby as "Not in Membership" in 1845, aged 60 years.

George HOOD of Selby was refused Membership of the Quakers in 1836.

Elected Overseer of the Poor of Selby in 1838.

Had both known (Selby) and unknown (some not stated 1846) property interests.

Possible (but unknown) links to COOK and/or PEARSON names.

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Offline dinny

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #29 on: Monday 10 September 18 22:08 BST (UK) »
Thank you to all those who have offered help and their thoughts on my question above. 

I guess the term "Head" applies to the holder of the lease/tenure and "Boarder Head" could mean the heads of other families living in the property - sort of a sublet situation where the "Boarder Head" is responsible for his or her  part of the arrangement. 

Thanks again - regards - Dinny. 


Offline ThrelfallYorky

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #30 on: Tuesday 11 September 18 15:45 BST (UK) »
I was always intrigued where one inhabitant might be down as "boarder", and the next as "lodger". Now there's another puzzle to unravel, for someone.
Threlfall (Southport), Isherwood (lancs & Canada), Newbould + Topliss(Derby), Keating & Cummins (Ireland + lancs), Fisher, Strong& Casson (all Cumberland) & Downie & Bowie, Linlithgow area Scotland . Also interested in Leigh& Burrows,(Lancashire) Griffiths (Shropshire & lancs), Leaver (Lancs/Yorks) & Anderson(Cumberland and very elusive)

Offline BushInn1746

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #31 on: Tuesday 11 September 18 16:18 BST (UK) »
Hello

1881 Census
"GENERAL INSTRUCTION.
This Paper to be filled up by the OCCUPIER or person in charge of the Dwelling. If a house is let or sub-let to separate Families or Lodgers, each OCCUPIER or LODGER must make a return for his portion of the house upon a SEPARATE SCHEDULE."


Words in capitals, are as printed.

The 1881 Census Form Download
http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20160110200232/http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/census/2011/how-our-census-works/about-censuses/census-history/200-years-of-the-census/census-1801-1901/1881-census-form.pdf


Comments
I have just looked at one "Boarder" in the England & Wales Census and clearly there is no separation from the others or the "Head" and he is on the same Schedule Number (in fact, the Boarder is between family members), so my "Boarder" does not mean any Letting or Sub-letting by the "Head" to the "Boarder" was occurring.

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If Letting was occurring, he/she should be a Lodger or Occupier on a separate Return / Paper and likely have a separate Schedule No. on the Census page (we see today).

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Generally, you cannot determine Ownership, or Tenure, from a Census with any degree of certainty at all.
 
 ----------

The only one you might determine as Letting it seems is a "Lodger" on a separate Return / Paper, with his / her own Schedule number in the Census.

 ----------

My Boarder - Long Term Stayer?
"Boarder" in my example, to me, simply means any long term stayers, some of whom were family / relations as previously discussed, as opposed to a shorter term "Visitor" who has come to stay overnight, or perhaps stay a week or two with their family, a friend, or a short stay while on business in the locality.


Mark
"George HOOD of Selby" Before 1812?

Born about 1785 (Yorkshire per 1841 Census)

Married Sarah RUSSELL at Selby 1815 newspaper - "both of that place".

Buried in the Quaker Burial Ground at Selby as "Not in Membership" in 1845, aged 60 years.

George HOOD of Selby was refused Membership of the Quakers in 1836.

Elected Overseer of the Poor of Selby in 1838.

Had both known (Selby) and unknown (some not stated 1846) property interests.

Possible (but unknown) links to COOK and/or PEARSON names.

Offline brigidmac

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #32 on: Tuesday 11 September 18 19:26 BST (UK) »
My Russian great grandfather was a boarder age 20 in 1891
 above him was a 40 year old woman with same surname.

no indication of how they were related

Later found out it was actually his father before he anglisized his name ..

.the age had been put in box for female...we spent years looking for this mysterious ' woman ' until his fathers original name was found on Russian documents

I always keep notes of lodgers and boarders names ...a few occasions where marriages or babies occur later with connections

Roberts,Fellman.Macdermid MCDERMID McDiarmid Gardner Jones ,Bloch,Irvine,Hallis Stevenson ,McKay

Offline ThrelfallYorky

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #33 on: Wednesday 12 September 18 13:59 BST (UK) »
Yes, boarders and lodgers are often further linked.
Thanks for the info. concerning boarders and lodgers, BushInn 1746, although I must say I've never really found evidence that there is separation of either from the main household. As a rule of thumb I'd wondered if most people felt a lodger was a longer term stayer?
Threlfall (Southport), Isherwood (lancs & Canada), Newbould + Topliss(Derby), Keating & Cummins (Ireland + lancs), Fisher, Strong& Casson (all Cumberland) & Downie & Bowie, Linlithgow area Scotland . Also interested in Leigh& Burrows,(Lancashire) Griffiths (Shropshire & lancs), Leaver (Lancs/Yorks) & Anderson(Cumberland and very elusive)

Offline JenB

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #34 on: Wednesday 12 September 18 15:19 BST (UK) »
I was always intrigued where one inhabitant might be down as "boarder", and the next as "lodger". Now there's another puzzle to unravel, for someone.

I've always understood that the difference was that a boarder paid for room and meals and a lodger paid for room only.
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Offline BushInn1746

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Re: Can the term "Boarder" in a census return turn out to be a family member
« Reply #35 on: Thursday 13 September 18 01:01 BST (UK) »
I was always intrigued where one inhabitant might be down as "boarder", and the next as "lodger". Now there's another puzzle to unravel, for someone.

I've always understood that the difference was that a boarder paid for room and meals and a lodger paid for room only.

Hello

Yes, the dictionary definition of "Bed and Board" means your 'Sleeping Accomodation and Meals' and my late Grandparents also referred to that as 'Bed and Board'.

Added: Board means meals, if you go to stay at a Hotel or Guest House 'Half Board' means accommodation with Breakfast AND Dinner. 'Full Board' is three meals a day.

ADDED: If you were sent away for the Term to Grammar School, you were quite often called a 'Boarder' and your bed and meals were provded, with the school known as a 'Boarding School' where you slept in a Dormitory. The phrase now I notice is 'Room and Board' if you have your own room to sleep in.

Added: The important thing for us, is that we have found some Boarders; Visitors and Lodgers to be related, not always directly to the Head of that Household, but related to the wider family.

Specimens of the old Householder's Schedules, with instructions to Householders about filling out their Schedule forms, for various Census are here (as pdf downloads) ...

Lodger - 1881 Census Form download "General Instruction."
Suggests a 'Lodger' occupies part of the house on a Let basis ...

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20160110200232/http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/census/2011/how-our-census-works/about-censuses/census-history/census-1801-1901/index.html

Mark
"George HOOD of Selby" Before 1812?

Born about 1785 (Yorkshire per 1841 Census)

Married Sarah RUSSELL at Selby 1815 newspaper - "both of that place".

Buried in the Quaker Burial Ground at Selby as "Not in Membership" in 1845, aged 60 years.

George HOOD of Selby was refused Membership of the Quakers in 1836.

Elected Overseer of the Poor of Selby in 1838.

Had both known (Selby) and unknown (some not stated 1846) property interests.

Possible (but unknown) links to COOK and/or PEARSON names.