Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - melba_schmelba

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 ... 110
19
Just curious, my mother has a great grandfather born in 1813, and I realized that might be a record in  my entire family tree, or the family trees of anyone I know of, even older relatives, living. Made possible by her father, grandfather and great grandfather all having children in their mid 40s. Can anyone beat it..or a grandparent, surely not :o?!!!

20
The Common Room / Re: 1921 census
« on: Sunday 09 January 22 14:28 GMT (UK)  »
It would appear common sense has not been used for the index, and that there's a lot of place information missing that should have been indexed. And unless we're prepared to also buy the transcript, we can't even correct it!

We will have to use the other index fields - the place info is just a tad unreliable.

 :( :( :(
As someone suggested earlier, I have saving all my corrections, and copying the transcript link from my records, and making a list to send to FindMyPast all in one go ;).

21
The Common Room / Re: 1921 census
« on: Thursday 06 January 22 20:10 GMT (UK)  »
I have purchased three original pages of the 1921 census that apply to my grandparents and am surprised that they do not seem to display a place of residence. This was one of the reasons that I subscribed in the first place. Previous censuses had their addresses in the first column. Am I missing something?

Yes -- several previous queries / replies about this!

Open the "filmstrip" at the bottom of the screen
Click on "Extra Materials
Then select "Front" --this will give the address
I have found that the 'Front' is often not sufficient, especially in somewhere like London, where you may just get a street name and postal district on the 'Front', you also need to download the 'Cover' which gives more specific area info i.e. civil parish, borough, ward, parliamentary borough, ecclesiastical parish etc. Extra Materials also includes a map showing the sub sections of that area often highlighted in different colours.

22
The Common Room / Re: 1921 census
« on: Thursday 06 January 22 15:22 GMT (UK)  »
Quite an annoying issue, is that you can't send a correction (as far as I can see), if you only buy the image, I'm not paying £2.50 for every correction I want to send!

I’ve emailed “support” instead!
Let us know if you get a positive response :). I'll start making a list which I can send them all in one go!

EDIT: if you go into 'My Records' at the top, you will get a list of all your purchases, you can then copy the link for the transcript (little page icon to right of camera icon) by right clicking > copy link.

23
The Common Room / Re: 1921 census
« on: Thursday 06 January 22 15:12 GMT (UK)  »
Quite an annoying issue, is that you can't send a correction (as far as I can see), if you only buy the image, I'm not paying £2.50 for every correction I want to send!

24
The Common Room / Re: 1921 census
« on: Thursday 06 January 22 12:43 GMT (UK)  »
All seemed to go fairly well, of my first 11 searches, 7 were found no problem, one had a mistranscribed first name, and one a mistranscribed surname. I found the two I couldn't find by

(i) searching for first name + first letter of last name and * wildcard, and
(ii) searching for the child's name of the other person, the child's full name was transcribed correctly.

Other methods you could use is just first name or surname + age + place. I note unlike the 1939 register, the exact birthdate is not included (although that was often wrong by a year or so).

Unexpectedly found a couple visiting friends, not at home, and some other children on holiday. I wonder if two other missing relatives were on holiday in Scotland - is the Scottish 1921 census available (or to be?)?

25
The Common Room / Re: Oldest legible gravestones in England, Scotland, Wales, NI?
« on: Tuesday 04 January 22 13:00 GMT (UK)  »
I googled it and got this answer
What is the oldest headstone in UK?
The oldest legible outdoor tombstone where we can read the inscription is possibly this one: It dates from 1616, and is in the Greyfriars Kirkyard in Edinburgh. The churchyard was founded in 1562 and burials have been taking place since here the late 16th century.
Just did a quick search of findagrave by date for Edinburgh and found a few earlier at Greyfriars

John Jackson, 1606
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/150575232/john-jackson

John Laing, 1614
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/177354784/john-laing

John Nasmyth, 1614
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/150524409/john-nasmyth

And at the Abbey of Holyrood

Margaret Hameltoun, 1592
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/150213011/margaret-hameltoun

Adam Bothwell, 1593
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/144913879/adam-bothwell

Lord James Douglas, 1608
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/142849832/james-douglas

However it appears they may have been once under a roof, which only collapsed in 1768.

Strange that these are all in Scotland, could it be something to do with the type of stone, and the generally colder conditions? Perhaps less pollution too, compared to somewhere like London or Manchester?



26
The Common Room / Re: Oldest legible gravestones in England, Scotland, Wales, NI?
« on: Tuesday 04 January 22 12:50 GMT (UK)  »
It all depends on your definition. If you include monuments inside churches, that will take you back much further.

In Kinkell kirkyard in Aberdeenshire there is the flat gravestone of Gilbert de Greenlaw, who was killed at the Battle of Harlaw in 1411. It was recycled in 1592, when it was turned over and reused for a Forbes burial. It now stands vertical so both inscriptions can be read.
Thanks GR2, very interesting, a comment on the Gilbert side of the stone indicates the carving only survived because it was protected from the elements when turned upside down to be reused

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/116968783/gilbert-de_greenlaw

A bit about the Battle of Harlaw where Gilbert died

https://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/inverurie/battleofharlaw/index.html

27
The Common Room / Oldest legible gravestones in England, Scotland, Wales, NI?
« on: Monday 03 January 22 21:34 GMT (UK)  »
Do we know which are the eldest gravestones with still legible names in each of the nations of the UK (excluding Roman tombs). I wonder if the use of stones only became really started again after the Norman conquest? But for several centuries afterwards most burials were still marked by wooden crosses? The eldest I have seen are mid 17th century.

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 ... 110