Author Topic: Edward Henry Collingworth, Death C. 1872  (Read 18121 times)

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, Died 24th Oct 1878
« Reply #72 on: Friday 15 February 19 21:47 GMT (UK) »
I have corrected the transcribed mistakes from the archive document of 1823. The wording is in the tense as written originally. Francis Edward Collingwood with mid-shipman John Pollard were both finally credited with killing the French sniper who killed Admiral Lord Nelson, from the mizzen mast of Le Redoutable. The dispute as to who killed the sniper had raged for 40 years, 30 years after Collingwood died

https://archive.org/stream/cihm_37593/cihm_37593_djvu.txt
page 258

*The Victory, 1744, here, is of course an earlier ship of the same name and not Nelson's flag-ship of which Francis Edward Joined at Spithead one month before Trafalgar......

FRANCIS EDWARD COLLINGWOOD, Esq.

Is descended from a very ancient family, the CoUingwoods,
of Eslington, co. Northumberland, led by their attachment to the House of Stuart, suffered a great reverse of fortune, in 1715. His grandfather, Edward, successively  master- attendant of the dock-yards at Plymouth, Portsmouth, Chatham, and Deptford, (the first person of the name  of Collingwood whom we find mentioned in our naval annals),  sailed round the world, as midshipman, with Anson, by whom  he was ever afterwards patronised, and was master of the  *Victory, first rate, flag- ship of Admiral Sir John Balchen, a  short time previous to her loss, in Oct. 1744 *.

 On the 3d Oct, 1744, the fleet under Sir John Balchen, then returning home from Gibraltar, encountered a violent storm, in which several  of the ships were much shattered. On the 4th, the "Victory separated  from her consorts, and was never more heard of. It is supposed that she  struck upon a ridge of rocks off the Caskets ; as from the testimony of  the men who attended the lights, and the inhabitants of the island of (GIBRALTA)
 
Mr. F. E, CoLLiNGWooD, only son of Francis Collngwood,  of Greenwich, Esq., by Sarah, sister to the hite Captain  Thomas Richbell, K. N., chief magistrate of the Thames  Police, was born at Milford, co. Pembroke 1785 and entered the royal navy, as midshipman on board the  America  commanded by his **uncle-in-law, the late Vice-Admiral Sir William Parker,  and subsequently served in the Pheasant sloop, Beaulieu and Alligator  frigates. Elephant and Victory of 100 guns, the latter  ship bearing the flag of the immortal Nelson, whose death he  avenged by shooting the French rifleman who had, after repeated attempts, succeeded in mortally wounding that illustrious hero at the ever memorable battle of Trafalgar. During  that tremendous conflict, he was sent from his quarters on  the poop, where the carnage was most dreadful, with a few  men, to assist in extinguishing a fire on board the French 74-  gun ship, le Redoubtable, which service he performed in a  manner highly satisfactory to his captain, the present Sir  Thomas M. Hardy. His promotion to the rank of lieutenant  took place on the 22d Jan. 1806.

After serving for some time in the Queen, flag-ship of  Lord Collingwood, and Bahama 74, one of the Spanish ships  captured off Trafalgar, this officer was appointed to the. Pallas  in which frigate we find him present, under the command of Captain (now Sir George F.)Seymour, at the destruction of five French men-of-war, in Aix Roads, April 12th, 1809  In the ensuing summer, he accompanied the  grand expedition sent against Antwerp, and was constantly  employed, in guard boats and on shore, during the occupation  of Walcheren. His next appointment was, Dec. 13th, 1809,  to be first lieutenant of the Iris 30, in M'hich ship he continued for a period of five years.

Alderney, many guns were heard on the nights of the 4th and 5th, but  the weather was too tempestuous to hazard boats out to their assistance. In this ship perished near one thousand men, besides fifty volunteers,  sons of the first nobility and gentry in the kingdom.
The Iris was principally employed in co-operation with the  patriots on the north coast of Spain, where Lieutenant Collingwood appears to have been a constant volunteer for boat  and shore service; and on many occasions obtained the particular approbation of Captain Sir George Collier, senior  officer of the squadron on that station.

 In  Nov. 1814, Mr. Coliingwood was appointed first lieutenant of the Niger, Captain Peter Rainier, under whom he served  for a short time on the Cape of Good Hope station. In December 1820, he obtained the command of the Kite revenue cruiser,  employed on the coast of Ireland, where he continued for the  usual period of three years.

During this time he had two  ribs and his breast bone fractured, was wounded by a pike
through the leg, and received two severe contusions on the  head, hie was also washed overboard in a heavy gale of  wind, and must have perished, all his boats having been previously lost, had not a following sea thrown him on the  square-sail brace, to which he clung until assisted in-board.

His promotion to the rank of commander took place January 15th, 1828.

This officer married, in May 1822, Ellen second daughter of the late Rev. Samuel Collis, of Fort William, co. Kerry, ly whom he has several children. His only surviving sister  was wife the of Dr. J. D. Burke, late surgeon of H. M. dockyard at Pembroke, and is now the widow of the Rev. Hugh
Taylor.

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, Died 24th Oct 1878
« Reply #73 on: Friday 15 February 19 21:59 GMT (UK) »
previous post,

 read original 1823 text scroll down to.....
 Collingwood, Francis Edward 258

page 258
 https://archive.org/stream/cihm_37593/cihm_37593_djvu.txt

Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, DEATH C. 1872
« Reply #74 on: Monday 22 July 19 14:57 BST (UK) »
The 'Earl Grey' was a convict ship that Edward Henry was working on to repair hull copper cladding damage to the forward bow and pump stages.

PATRICK BRYAN, JAMES KERR, Theft > simple larceny, 15th May 1848.

Reference Number: t18480515-1350
Offence: Theft > simple larceny
Verdict: Guilty > no_subcategory; Guilty > no_subcategory
Punishment: Transportation. 10 years.

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18480515-name-918&div=t18480515-1350#highlight
These are his actual words in giving evidence in a 'simple larceny' trial at the Old Bailey.....

JOHN WHITE. I am a constable of the dock. I was at the export dock gate when Willson stopped Bryan—I stopped Kerr—he said, "You won't want me; you want the other men that have run away"—I said, "I have got you and I shall keep you"—I searched him, and found 4lbs, of copper in the waistband of his trowsers—he said it was given him by a man in a public-house—Bryan said, "It is no use telling a lie about it; we may as well tell the truth."

EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD. I am in the employ of a shipwright I was employed in taking some copper off the ship 'Earl Grey', belonging to Mr. Duncan Dunbar—I threw the copper on the punt—I can swear to all this copper, except two pieces—it came off that ship—two of these pieces in particular I can swear to, and the other I have no doubt of—they were all in the punt, which was under the ship's bow, acting as a stage for me to work at the vessel—I know this piece by my own marking on it, and this one by its acting as a brace under the pump case.

JAMES GATLOR. I am ship-keeper of the Earl Grey, and live on board I took the copper from the punt into the store, where it was kept—it belonged to Duncan Dunbar—I went to the store on the day after this copper was found, and it was all gone.
Kerr. Q. How long was the copper in the store before you missed it? A. About nine or ten days.
THOMAS PINNER. I was working for Mr. Gladstone—I went to the store shed between ten and eleven o'clock—I found the padlock broken—I told the officer—I found the prisoners in custody the same day.








http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18480515-name-918&div=t18480515-1350#highlight


Offline Daniel Collingwood

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Re: EDWARD HENRY COLLINGWOOD, DEATH C. 1872
« Reply #75 on: Monday 22 July 19 15:17 BST (UK) »
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Re: Edward Henry Collingwood b.1817 - d.1878 Old Hong Kong
« Reply #117 on: Today at 15:13 »
QuoteModify
long way into scroll at No. 258

https://archive.org/stream/cihm_37593/cihm_37593_djvu.txt

FRANCIS EDWARD COLLINGWOOD, Esq.

Is descended from a very ancient family, the CoUingwoods,
of Eslington, co. Northumberland, Avho, led by their attach-
ment to the House of Stuart, suffered a great reverse of for-
tune, in J 71 5. His grandfather, Edward, successively
master- attendant of the dock-yards at Plymouth, Ports-
mouth, Chatham, and Deptford, (the first person of the name
of Collingwood whom we find mentioned in our naval annals),
sailed round the world, as midshipman, with Anson, by whom
he was ever afterwards patronised, and was master of the
Victory, first rate, flag- ship of Admiral Sir John Balchen, a
short time previous to her loss, in Oct. 1744 *.

• On the 3d Oct, 1744, the fleet under Sir John Balchen, then return-
ing home from Gibraltar, encountered a violent storm, in which several
of the ships were much shattered. On the 4th, the "Victory separated
from her consorts, and was never more heard of. It is supposed that she
struck upon a ridge of rocks off the Caskets ; as from the testimony of
the men ^vho attended the lights, and the inhabitants of the island of ......


. Mr. Francis. Edward, Collingwood, only son of Francis Collngwood,
of Greenwich, Esq., by Sarah, sister to the hite Captain
Thomas Richbell, K. N., chief magistrate of the Thames
Police, was born at Milford, co. Pembroke, Mar. 23(1, IZHi ;
and entered the royal navy, as midshipman on board the
America 64, commanded by his uncle-in-law, the late Vice-
Admiral Sir William Parker, IJart., in IJiB*; and subse-
quently served in the Pheasant sloop, Beaulieu and Alligator
frigates. Elephant 7'lj and Victory of 1(X) guns, the latter
ship bearing the flag of the immortal Nelson, whose death he
avenged by shooting the French rifleman who had, after re-
peated attempts, succeeded in mortally wounding that illus-
trious hero at the ever memorable battle of Trafalgar. During
that tremendous conflict, he was sent from his quarters on
the poop, where the carnage was most dreadful, with a few
men, to assist in extinguishing a fire on board the French 74-
gun ship, le Redoubtable, which service he performed in a
manner highly satisfactory to his captain, the present Sir
Thomas M. Hardy. His promotion to the rank of lieutenant
took place on the 22d Jan. 1806.

After serving for some time in the Queen 98, flag-ship of
Lord Collingwood, and Bahama 74, one of the Spanish ships
captured off Trafalgar, this officer was appointed to the. Pal-
las 32, in which frigate we find him present, under the com -
mand of Captain (now Sir George F.) Seymour, at the de-
struction of five French men-of-war, in Aix Roads, April
12th, 1809 f. In the ensuing summer, he accompanied the
grand expedition sent against Antwerp, and was constantly
employed, in guard boats and on shore, during the occupation
of Walcheren. His next appointment was, Dec. 13th, 1809,
to be first lieutenant of the Iris 30, in M'hich ship he con-
tinued for a period of five years.

Alderney, many guns were heard on the nights of the 4th and 5th, but
the weather was too tempestuous to hazard boats out to their assisiaute.
In this ship perished near one thousand men, besides fifty volunteers,
sons of the first nobility and gentry in the kingdom.

 COMMANDERS.

The Iris was principally employed in co-operation with the
patriots on the north coast of Spain, where Lieutenant Col-
lingwood appears to have been a constant volunteer for boat
and shore service; and on many occasions obtained the par-
ticular approbation of Captain Sir George Collier, senior
officer of the squadron on that station. A sketch of the
transactions in which he was engaged in the years 1811,
1812, and 1813.

In 1813, the Iris, then commanded by Captain H. H.
Christian, captured three American letters of manpie. In
Nov. 1814, Mr. Coliingwood was appointed first lieutenant
of the Niger 38, Captain Peter Rainier, under whom he served
for a short time on the Cape of Good Hope station. In Dec.
1820, he obtained the command of the Kite revenue cruiser,
employed on the coast of Ireland, wliere he continued for the
usual period of three years. During this time he had two
ribs and his breast bone fractured, was wounded by a pike
through the leg, and received two severe contusions on the
head, hie was also washed overboard in a heavy gale of
wind, and must have perished, all his boats having been pre-
viously lost, had not a following sea thrown him on the
square-sail brace, to which he clung until assisted in-board.
His promotion to the rank of commander took place Jan.
15th, 1828.

This officer married, in May 1822, Ellen second daughter
of the late Rev. Samuel Collis, of Fort William, co. Kerry,
-ly whom he has several children. His only surviving sister
•vas tlie wife of Dr. J. D. Burke, late surgeon of H. M. dock-
yard at Pembroke, and is now the widow of the Rev. Hugh
Taylor. . .



Offline Daniel Collingwood

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The hanging of George Collingword - Jacobite Rebellion
« Reply #76 on: Friday 25 October 19 15:29 BST (UK) »
Since the hanging of George Collingwood-1716 at Liverpool for his part in the Jacobite Rebellion, it is known that this halted the line of Collingwoods that served as High Sheriffs of Northumberland for at least two generations. In the meantime (as was the case after Cromwell's Civil War) many Royalists fled for fear of retribution and confiscation of land and farms, Relatives with the surname of Collingwood fled fom Durham and Northumberland and emerged in Port Areas of many cities including London. The emergence of Alexander Collingwood of Unthank Hall shows t

hey were not unduly on Britain's wanted list. It took time but they came back from the stigma of great uncle George who incidentally was one of only four conspirators to be Hung Drawn and Quartered.

first of the Collingwoods took office in 1544
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Sheriff_of_Northumberland


http://www.northumbrianjacobites.org.uk/pages/detail_page.php?id=57&section=25

https://www.blogpreston.co.uk/2015/11/1715-battle-of-preston-a-chronology-of-events-during-the-jacobite-uprising-final-part-12/

https://www.alamy.com/george-collingwood-rebel-supporter-of-james-stuart-the-pretender-executed-for-treason-liverpool-1716-engraving-from-james-caulfields-portraits-memoirs-and-characters-of-remarkable-persons-london-1819-image211158624.html

https://www.hslc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/91-3-Wardle.pdf