Author Topic: Another local expression - do you have a variant?  (Read 44227 times)

Online BumbleB

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Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
« Reply #18 on: Sunday 21 December 08 23:03 GMT (UK) »
Hi:  so no-one lives near Tamworth in Staffordshire?!

In Tamworth, believe it or not, a moggie is a mouse!!

You do get some funny looks when you talk about your pet moggie.

Have a good Christmas

BumbleB   ::)  ::)
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Offline maidmarianoops

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Offline MKG

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Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
« Reply #20 on: Monday 22 December 08 00:29 GMT (UK) »
Yep - In South Yorkshire (or at least around Doncaster) in the early 60s, a moggie was both - a cat and a mouse. Makes for an interesting chase.
Griffiths, Howard, Johnson, McLeod, Rizz(a)(i)(o)
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Offline Cell

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Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
« Reply #21 on: Monday 22 December 08 08:01 GMT (UK) »
Hi,
The word Moggie/moggy apparently was first used to describe old cows according to the below article( don't know how true it is) and may come from the name Margaret.

I use moggie  to describe  mongrel cats and of course the Morris Minor. It mentions in the article that it is used for mouse too
Just a wee tad here is the article:
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moggy
Kind Regards :)
Purdy-Loughconnelly
McNeill-Loughconnelly & Broughshane
Graham -Derry,Ballymoney,Carrickfergus & Ballymena
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Carlsen (also called Carlson & Karlson )B in Former Russia (Finland) & Swansea S.Wales.
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Offline Emjaybee

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Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
« Reply #22 on: Monday 22 December 08 09:05 GMT (UK) »
Moggie:

A Morgan car made in Malvern
Beard Voyce, Scrivens in Worcestershire

Offline Dancing Master

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Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
« Reply #23 on: Monday 22 December 08 19:16 GMT (UK) »
When asking "what is for dinner the Lancashire answer was "Pigs bum and cabbage". or an alternative  the rude word for muck with sugar on.

Moggie depends on where you live,  In South of Lancashire its a mouse,  in North of Lancashire its a cat.


Online BumbleB

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Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
« Reply #24 on: Monday 22 December 08 19:55 GMT (UK) »
Ad I'd never come across the term moggie meeting mouse until I came to live in Tamworth, I assumed it was very local.  Now realise that it is widespread!  We all learn something every day  :-[

Dancing Master - my grandmother always, when asked what is for dinner, replied "chums".  West Riding ?

BumbleB
Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
Remember - "They'll be found when they want to be found" !!!
If you don't ask the question, you won't get an answer.
He/she who never made a mistake, never made anything.
Archbell - anywhere, any date
Kendall - WRY
Milner - WRY
Appleyard - WRY

Offline pete edwards

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Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
« Reply #25 on: Monday 22 December 08 21:26 GMT (UK) »
Im Starved,

any idea what that means here in Shropshire?

Pete :) :)
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Offline vic1

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Re: Another local expression - do you have a variant?
« Reply #26 on: Monday 22 December 08 21:48 GMT (UK) »
I'm starved means I'm cold  or at least it does in north herefordshire
pembrokeshire Coates,Rees, Williams
galmorgan Coates Williams Francis
brecknock stephens Driscoll lewis Webb Jones price
herefordshire Jones page savager price carwardine
radnorshire Rees savager Jones