Author Topic: Cherrymount and Tullykinally near Lurgan?  (Read 18830 times)

Offline Coill mo cholm Óg

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Re: Cherrymount and Tullykinally near Lurgan?
« Reply #36 on: Sunday 07 August 22 22:11 BST (UK) »
To Malachy 51.  I know there was an Isabella Gallery born August 8th 1854 and of the Donegreagh family, who married an Edward Casey in 1878 and had quite a large family. Two of her daughters became nuns. Her parents were David & Ellen ( or Eleanor ) Gallery.

Offline Kiltaglassan

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Re: Cherrymount and Tullykinally near Lurgan?
« Reply #37 on: Monday 08 August 22 07:32 BST (UK) »
I know there was an Isabella Gallery born August 8th 1854 and of the Donegreagh family, who married an Edward Casey in 1878 and had quite a large family.

Just adding the link for the 1878 marriage for others reading-

https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/images/marriage_returns/marriages_1878/11100/8062600.pdf

Donagreagh townland
https://www.townlands.ie/armagh/oneilland-east/magheralin/cornakinnegar/donagreagh/

Might this be the death of Isabella's father - 1887?
https://civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/images/deaths_returns/deaths_1887/06217/4779107.pdf

From PRONI Will Calendars:
The Will of David Gallery late of Donagreagh County Armagh Farmer who died 4 June 1887 at same place was proved at Armagh by Joseph Gallery of Donagreagh and Bernard Gallery of Drumnakerne both in said County Farmers the Executors.


Researching: Cuthbertson – Co. Derry, Scotland & Australia; Hunter – Co. Derry; Jackson – Co. Derry, Scotland & Canada; Scott – Co. Derry; Neilly – Co. Antrim & USA; McCurdy – Co. Antrim; Nixon – Co. Cavan, Co. Donegal, Canada & USA; Ryan & Noble – Co. Sligo

Offline Coill mo cholm Óg

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Re: Cherrymount and Tullykinally near Lurgan?
« Reply #38 on: Monday 08 August 22 13:40 BST (UK) »
Yes, Kiltaglassan, that agrees with what we know.

Offline Kiltaglassan

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Re: Cherrymount and Tullykinally near Lurgan?
« Reply #39 on: Monday 08 August 22 14:49 BST (UK) »
Yes, Kiltaglassan, that agrees with what we know.

Thanks  :)

It's always important to post links to information found.


Researching: Cuthbertson – Co. Derry, Scotland & Australia; Hunter – Co. Derry; Jackson – Co. Derry, Scotland & Canada; Scott – Co. Derry; Neilly – Co. Antrim & USA; McCurdy – Co. Antrim; Nixon – Co. Cavan, Co. Donegal, Canada & USA; Ryan & Noble – Co. Sligo


Offline Coill mo cholm Óg

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Re: Cherrymount and Tullykinally near Lurgan?
« Reply #40 on: Tuesday 09 August 22 09:51 BST (UK) »
Point taken  :)

Offline Malachy51

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Re: Cherrymount and Tullykinally near Lurgan?
« Reply #41 on: Thursday 18 August 22 21:49 BST (UK) »
Edward and Isabella were my great grandparents. My grandfather was David, one of their 10 children.

Offline Coill mo cholm Óg

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Re: Cherrymount and Tullykinally near Lurgan?
« Reply #42 on: Friday 19 August 22 09:18 BST (UK) »
Isabella's older brother, Joseph, 1850-1907, was my great-grandfather. Their parents were David & Ellen Gallery( née Doran ). So we are third cousins.

Offline ToddLangtry

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Re: Cherrymount and Tullykinally near Lurgan?
« Reply #43 on: Tuesday 03 January 23 00:22 GMT (UK) »
Hi Folks & Happy 2023.

I've been our of circulation for the latter half of 2022 due to travel, house moves, renovations etc) and am just getting back to some notifications sent to me in July/August of 2022. For some reason took me back to page 3 of this chat in 2012 where folks were asking me questions and I can't see that I've responded - apologies, not sure what happened there. 

Good news is that since 2012 I've done a lot more research on the Langtry's of N Ireland and Meath, and thanks to DNA have also fleshed out a number of the families of Langtry wives (on my direct line of descent).  Happy to try and answer any questions you may have.

I actually drove up to Cherrymount and knocked on the door to see if anyone was home, but sadly no one was. I didn't take any photos as I felt that would be intrusive. Would love to try again next time I'm over there.

Offline Coill mo cholm Óg

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Re: Cherrymount and Tullykinally near Lurgan?
« Reply #44 on: Tuesday 03 January 23 10:32 GMT (UK) »
Greetings, neighbour by a few generations :-)  Having taken part in an archaeological dig in Donegreagh, the next townland to Cornakinnegar last August , I feel even more connected to this place and it's history. But for to the closure of the walkway over the railway track about 20 years ago, anyone could have made their way on foot directly from my townland to yours. From Cherrymount there is a laneway with stone-built walls and the remnants of a stone paved lane which led to an old cemetery in the field named Kilmocholmóg. Folk memory recounts the tale of the last 2 burials which took place there, one prior to the completion of the Belfast to Portadown railway, and one shortly after, placing them c. late 1830's and early 1840's (ref. http://www.craigavonhistoricalsociety.org.uk/rev/frielrailwayscraig.php ) The community based archaeology project is searching for evidence of an ancient church, since the name of the field means 'church of my young Colmán'.  No written records of a church exist, and niether do the oldest detailed maps for the area ( 1751 , Brownlow Papers ) indicate any such building, but the dig revealed the remains of a stone structure with a door pivot stone, and medieval pottery sherds. Within metres a collapsed souterrain was also discovered, and such structures were often associated with a church. The experts were all very excited and funding will be sought by the Historic Environment Division of Armagh, Banbridge & Craigavon Borough Council to do a more extensive excavation next summer. https://lurgantownscapeheritage.com/event/7-december-lurgan-lecture-digging-deeper-into-kilmocholmog/  Enjoy !