Author Topic: The worst Ancestry transcription ever?  (Read 90478 times)

Offline BumbleB

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Re: The worst Ancestry transcription ever?
« Reply #252 on: Thursday 15 February 24 17:16 GMT (UK) »
Tin man - NOOOOO - you have to transcribe exactly what you see.   Interpretation should NOT enter into transcriptions of records.
Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
Remember - "They'll be found when they want to be found" !!!
If you don't ask the question, you won't get an answer.
He/she who never made a mistake, never made anything.
Archbell - anywhere, any date
Kendall - WRY
Milner - WRY
Appleyard - WRY

Offline LizzieW

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Re: The worst Ancestry transcription ever?
« Reply #253 on: Thursday 15 February 24 17:18 GMT (UK) »
Whenever I've transcribed records (not Ancestry), two people have had to transcribe the same record and if there was a discrepancy it was looked at again by other people.  This way, there was a good chance that the eventual record  transcription would be correct.

Lizzie

Offline Tin man

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Re: The worst Ancestry transcription ever?
« Reply #254 on: Thursday 15 February 24 20:02 GMT (UK) »
So a transcription is exactly what you see. So if for example, a transcriber came across the name SMITH spelt SMIFF, they would have to transcribe it as SMIFF?
Cornwall: Bailey, Bilkey, Collins, Goldsworthy, Holman, Ivey, Martin, Michell, White.
Lancashire: Clough, Hargreaves,Hilton.

Online mckha489

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Re: The worst Ancestry transcription ever?
« Reply #255 on: Thursday 15 February 24 20:06 GMT (UK) »
So a transcription is exactly what you see. So if for example, a transcriber came across the name SMITH spelt SMIFF, they would have to transcribe it as SMIFF?

Yes.
And similarly if it says Wm you cannot put William.



Offline Tin man

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Re: The worst Ancestry transcription ever?
« Reply #256 on: Thursday 15 February 24 20:13 GMT (UK) »
Oh, i see.
What about a spoken transcription? When the enumerators were filling in the census in the 1900's, if they heard SMIFF they would surely have written SMITH? knowing that the illiterate householder just mis-pronounced their own surname?
Cornwall: Bailey, Bilkey, Collins, Goldsworthy, Holman, Ivey, Martin, Michell, White.
Lancashire: Clough, Hargreaves,Hilton.

Offline BumbleB

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Re: The worst Ancestry transcription ever?
« Reply #257 on: Thursday 15 February 24 20:38 GMT (UK) »
Sorry, Tin man - Whatever is written is what it is - we can never know what the enumerator heard!!
Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
Remember - "They'll be found when they want to be found" !!!
If you don't ask the question, you won't get an answer.
He/she who never made a mistake, never made anything.
Archbell - anywhere, any date
Kendall - WRY
Milner - WRY
Appleyard - WRY

Online mckha489

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Re: The worst Ancestry transcription ever?
« Reply #258 on: Thursday 15 February 24 20:40 GMT (UK) »
Oh, i see.
What about a spoken transcription? When the enumerators were filling in the census in the 1900's, if they heard SMIFF they would surely have written SMITH? knowing that the illiterate householder just mis-pronounced their own surname?

I imagine that varied according to the enumerators at the time.  I get the impression some of them were more literate than others.  And yes..if they knew what the name really was they probably wrote it.

But this can be an issue with for example H names.  Eg someone might say their surname is ORTON and the enumerator thinks , “Oh, from the way you speak, you must  mean HORTON”. But actually, they really are ORTON  (of course this is the sort of name that changes anyway over the generations for that very reason, but you understand what I mean I hope)

Anyway…all this is to show - always look at the original image if you possibly can (because the other thing that transcribers have is a certain number of fields available to fill. And sometimes there is information on the image that isn’t in the transcription.
The other problem is fast typing.  It is very easy to write for example 1689 instead of 1698. 

And I’ve done transcribing where the thing I am transcribing clearly has an error, but because it is there in the original document It has to be perpetuated.


It would be very boring if it was all straight forward. There wouldn’t be the satisfaction of solving something.

Offline Tin man

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Re: The worst Ancestry transcription ever?
« Reply #259 on: Thursday 15 February 24 21:50 GMT (UK) »
ah yes, i get it. A written mistake has to be repeated even if it's known to be wrong. What an enumerator heard will never be known because it was an oral record. Fast typing creates mistakes - i meant to type 1800's not 1900's.
Thankyou.  :)
Cornwall: Bailey, Bilkey, Collins, Goldsworthy, Holman, Ivey, Martin, Michell, White.
Lancashire: Clough, Hargreaves,Hilton.

Offline andrewalston

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Re: The worst Ancestry transcription ever?
« Reply #260 on: Thursday 15 February 24 21:59 GMT (UK) »
Don't forget that people did not write down what was said, but what they THOUGHT they heard.

My own paternal ggg gf appears in various records with his surname spelled in NINE different ways. None of these spellings matches my own surname.

Are these names wrong? No.

I can't guess how he pronounced the name, but "educated" people commonly had trouble figuring out what he said.

I use the version which appears on his baptism and burial as the "primary" name. All the versions appear in my FH software with dates against them.

When my ggf married in 1891 the clergyman write down yet another version; one he would have been familiar with. His bride was literate, so the new version stuck.
Looking at ALSTON in south Ribble area, ALSTEAD and DONBAVAND/DUNBABIN etc. everywhere, HOWCROFT and MARSH in Bolton and Westhoughton, PICKERING in the Whitehaven area.

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