Author Topic: Russian Polish immigrant to Wales at turn of century  (Read 2584 times)

Offline Gwaelodian

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Re: Russian Polish immigrant to Wales at turn of century
« Reply #18 on: Friday 08 June 18 19:05 BST (UK) »
Thankyou for that.  Ernest never mentioned his younger siblings other than to say as the new babies came he got more and more lonely and often played on his own. I wonder why he was so alone.

 It interests me, too, that he came back to Wales to open his shops. At one point, he worked as a shipís chandlers in Cardiff, then he emigrated to Canada. I suppose memory is always hard to fix chronologically. He may have got the order of events out of line.

 The internet has helped me a lot, but you researchers on Rootschat are superb and generous with your time and interest. Iíve started scanning into my computer all the typed notes I made from my old typewriter thirty years ago. Itís very time consuming but I hope I can establish a more accurate time scale. Thanks for your help. It seems important to add his life to the history of Jewish immigrant life in Wales.
:)

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Offline Gwaelodian

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Re: Russian Polish immigrant to Wales at turn of century
« Reply #19 on: Saturday 09 June 18 11:46 BST (UK) »
I have read through many notes I took thirty years ago, and have this to add to the thread: I found this  note: Why isnít Kiblitch there? Why is Crosinsylka only a town of my memory?
Does that suggest his Kiblitch is an area? I am confused!
Other notes: He speaks of Chaider /the Synagogue in Tredegar. going to the County School and the Cinema in Commercial street. The pawn shop that was ravaged in the 1911 riots was next door to the cinema. He says his mother and sister were hiding in a neighbour's house for safety.
In 1914, they were living in Cardiff. Friends from London were taking shelter there.

He says his mother and sister both went to university. Does he mean in Cardiff, given what Justin wrote about life in Russian Poland. His sister Fagie went on to London, to Queen  Charlotte's hospital, as a mid wife.

In 1916, he went to seek work in Canada. After a year there, he was back in Cardiff. He mentions his parents living in Tudor Street. He took a job with Percy Capel, a ships chandler. In 1929, he took an apprenticeship but doesn't clarify in what, but he seems to have moved into the catering industry. In 1931, he writes of being general manager to a conglomerate in Manchester, The Piccadilly. He appears to have opened a wine shop in Cardiff, Jackmore's Wine Suppliers. There are more sorties into catering and he ends up catering for Denham Film Studios. When the studios folded, he says he bought out the costume department. This led him into fashion and ultimately to his three shops in the Welsh Valleys.

Thank you to everyone who helped me sort out his early days, with names and dates. Now, I just might write up his life story from a two inch pile of notes and letters!

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Offline Gwaelodian

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Re: Russian Polish immigrant to Wales at turn of century
« Reply #20 on: Saturday 09 June 18 12:03 BST (UK) »
Justin
You wrote that the mother would have been unlikely to have had an education. Gershie wrote:'On her wedding day, my grandfather Writson had presented to my mother the deeds of a Chemist's shop. She had graduated from University as a chemist and immediately, as soon as the ceremonies were over, she, Chika Writson, married my father, Benchein Gerschenzatson, and they settled together in the house behind the shop in Kibblitz. My grandparents had had four daughters, all of whom had gone to University, graduated well. One was a doctor, another had studied music, the third had qualified in husbandry, and as I have already written, my mother was a chemist. These women, my aunts, women we left behind us, are all dead now. '

His father seemed to have been an estates manager for aristocracy. He left  England  when he thought he was about to be conscripted. The wife and two children followed when he was established in Tredegar.  He has given many details of the village, which I have compared to the sketch map in the book you recommended. Some similarities but not exactly. I notice in the sketch a book shop is detailed. Interesting!


Offline JustinL

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Re: Russian Polish immigrant to Wales at turn of century
« Reply #21 on: Sunday 10 June 18 14:48 BST (UK) »
Hello Norma,

I am increasingly sceptical about the Wrightson (probably Reytsen in reality) girls going to university. From the little research I have done, it is clear that there were numerous obstacles for women in general, notwithstanding the outright ban imposed by the Russia government at one stage. Women generally had to go abroad, particularly to Switzerland and Austria, to gain a university education, which came at a price. Those women fortunate to study came from reasonably affluent families, lived in larger metropolitan cities (particularly St. Petersburg) and generally commenced their studies somewhat later than men, because it took time to overcome the obstacles. It's an interesting field of research.

British universities of that era weren't exactly liberal in their attitude to admitting women either.

But then again, difficult does not mean impossible.

However, Emanuel's mother was married at scarcely 18 (not unusual in the Jewish communities of 19th century Russia) and a mother shortly afterwards; mother of two by the time she was 20-ish, with another two being born and dying before the 1911 census.

His memories of his own life will make fascinating reading by the sounds of it. Quite a character!

Kiblych/Kiblich is definitely a village, and as far as I can determine, there was only one. I can't identify Crosinsylka. Is that the only spelling he used?

The cheder was the Jewish school that he would have attended in addition to public school for his religious education.

I stumbled across this article https://www.jpost.com/Jewish-World/Jewish-Features/A-cantor-in-the-wind about Tredegar's rabbi from 1931/2 onwards. Seemingly, his in-laws (Isaac Gaba and Malka Yosum) also came from Kiblich.

This is all too interesting!!

Offline Gwaelodian

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Re: Russian Polish immigrant to Wales at turn of century
« Reply #22 on: Sunday 10 June 18 16:12 BST (UK) »
I note you call him Emanuel. He called himself Ernest. I have other personal details that I don't feel able to write on line, so how can I tell you less openly? I am increasingly interested in this story. As I upload more and more I wrote down from telephone calls, conversations and letters, I see much I had forgotten.

The novel you suggested makes interesting reading, too. I'm about half way through. Some ties directly with his descriptions, particularly the markets.

He spoke of sledge journeys to his Grandparents. As for Crosinsylka,  I have copied it from his handwriting as best I can. I also couldn't find it... but then, I also couldn't find Kibblitch.

Thanks.
Norma

Offline JustinL

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Re: Russian Polish immigrant to Wales at turn of century
« Reply #23 on: Sunday 10 June 18 17:41 BST (UK) »
You can send me a private message. Click on the icon below the census copyright statement on the left hand side of your last post.

Can you perhaps scan and post a section of letter containing Crosinsylka? You never know, I might read it as something else. I need to locate some historical maps.

How were you able to get hold of the novel so quickly? Does the author say much about his sources?

Justin

Offline Gwaelodian

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Re: Russian Polish immigrant to Wales at turn of century
« Reply #24 on: Sunday 10 June 18 18:25 BST (UK) »
You can buy it on line from Google books. Under four pounds. Written by an American woman, based on tales her grandfather told her. A gossipy love story, but she includes a sketch map of the village, which must have some degree of accuracy. Will pm you after weíve cooked and eaten.

Offline Gwaelodian

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Re: Russian Polish immigrant to Wales at turn of century
« Reply #25 on: Sunday 10 June 18 21:44 BST (UK) »
Justin
I tried to pm you but got the message your name  was not registered ( or something like that).Anyway, it didn't send. Perhaps you can advise what should have gone in the message slot other than JustinL

Offline Rena

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Re: Russian Polish immigrant to Wales at turn of century
« Reply #26 on: Sunday 10 June 18 23:46 BST (UK) »
I found a timeline for women's education in general which also mentions university admittance in several countries during the 19th century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_women%27s_education#19th_century

My maternal grandmother's family member arrived in England in 1861 and changed their German surname to a British equivalent when the riots you referred to broke out in England due to a slump in jobs.   At the time the family had two shops which had to close. 
Aberdeen: Findlay-Shirras,McCarthy<br />MidLothian: Mason,Telford,Darling,Cruikshanks,Bennett,Sime, Bell<br />Lanarks:Crum, Brown, MacKenzie,Cameron, Glen, Millar
Ross, Urray:Mackenzie<br />Moray: Findlay; Marshall/Marischell<br />Perthshire: Brown Ferguson<br />Wales: McCarthy, Thomas<br />England: Almond, Askin, Dodson, Harrison, Maw, McCarthy, Munford, Pye, Shearing, Smith, Smythe, Speight, Strike, Wallis/Wallace, Ward, Wells<br />Germany: Flamme,Ehlers, Bielstein, Germer, Mohlm, Reupke