Author Topic: Cause of death on death certificate from 1934  (Read 571 times)

Offline Gadget

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Re: Cause of death on death certificate from 1934
« Reply #9 on: Sunday 30 December 18 12:54 GMT (UK) »
I thought that was an address Gadget: 1943 Starr (or something)  :-\

Oops  :-[- will have another look

Added - correct - I only saw the 1943  :-X
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Offline jmec73

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Re: Cause of death on death certificate from 1934
« Reply #10 on: Sunday 30 December 18 12:57 GMT (UK) »
Thanks, I hadn't clocked Lab purposes which sounds rather ominous too! As you say it's unlikely a pregnancy would get that far these days. I'm not sure if Family Search have autopsy reports too, so will check that out. All very sad as you say :o(

BW, Jon.

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Offline Ruskie

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Re: Cause of death on death certificate from 1934
« Reply #11 on: Sunday 30 December 18 13:03 GMT (UK) »
I thought it related to the 1943 Star WW2 medal until I saw that it was in section for the address.  :)


Offline carlineric

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Re: Cause of death on death certificate from 1934
« Reply #12 on: Sunday 30 December 18 14:55 GMT (UK) »
There is a Starr Avenue in Toledo. Not a nice thought, could the disposal refer to remains being kept in an anatomical museum.

Eric

Offline BushInn1746

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Re: Cause of death on death certificate from 1934
« Reply #13 on: Sunday 30 December 18 14:58 GMT (UK) »
Regarding the wording 'Congenitally malformed monstrosity’.

It would have been more sympathetic and sensitive for the person deciding on the cause of death to use the alternative wording of 'Great Congenital Deformity', which they could of used instead.

Mark
"George HOOD of Selby" Before 1812?

Born about 1785 (Yorkshire per 1841 Census)

Married Sarah RUSSELL at Selby 1815 newspaper - "both of that place".

Buried in the Quaker Burial Ground at Selby as "Not in Membership" in 1845, aged 60 years.

George HOOD of Selby was refused Membership of the Quakers in 1836.

Elected Overseer of the Poor of Selby in 1838.

Had both known (Selby) and unknown (some not stated 1846) property interests.

Possible (but unknown) links to COOK and/or PEARSON names.

Offline jmec73

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Re: Cause of death on death certificate from 1934
« Reply #14 on: Sunday 30 December 18 15:42 GMT (UK) »
Hi Carlineric, I'd wondered the same thing about some macabre museum display item :o( The original Flower hospital no longer exists as it was re-sited in 1975 to elsewhere in Ohio, but I'm tempted to contact them and see if they have anything their records which might reveal more - although part of me doesn't want to know any more gruesome details!

BW, Jon

Offline Annie65115

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Re: Cause of death on death certificate from 1934
« Reply #15 on: Tuesday 01 January 19 19:40 GMT (UK) »
“Congenital monstrosity” is an old fashioned, and to our ears horribly inhumane way, of describing a newborn who has multiple severe deformities which don’t fit an obvious pattern. So a child with problems associated with a spina bífida may have had multiple such problems, but because they could all be put down to the one underlying cause, it would simply be acknowledged as due to the spina bífida. A child described as having (being?) a “congenital monstrosity” would have other problems that couldn’t be easily ascribed to any one underlying problem.

I don’t think it was  intended to mean that the child was a monster as such - but of course it must have sounded that way to the poor parents.

Such problems could have a number of possible causes, eg infections whilst mum was pregnant, rare genetic or chromosomal syndromes, amniotic band syndrome (don’t google this if you’re feeling squeamish), instances of conjoined (“Siamese”) twins where the separation of the two babies had gone badly wrong, etc.

(It was used to describe such problems in animals as well as in humans and if you google the term you will find many similar references from the vet. World).

Regarding the lab comment, the baby’s body may have been kept by the hospital where it was born - not as a ghoulish freak show, but to try to analyse the cause of the deformities, to teach other medical staff etc. Nowadays of course this could not happen without the consent of the parents - I suspect that such niceties were ignored 85 years ago. But some good may thus have  come of this poor family’s grief. Medical schools nowadays still have museum collections like this from decades ago but the whole ethos has changed, and certainly in my alma mater, there is a great deal of respect given to these, as befits the remains of people born not that long ago.
Bradbury (Sedgeley, Bilston, Warrington)
Cooper (Sedgeley, Bilston)
Kilner/Kilmer (Leic, Notts)
Greenfield (Liverpool)
Holyland (Leic)
Pryce/Price (Welshpool, Liverpool)
Rawson (Leicester)
Upton (Desford, Leics)
Partrick (Vera and George, Leicester)
Marshall (Cheshire/Leicester)

Offline willyam

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Re: Cause of death on death certificate from 1934
« Reply #16 on: Wednesday 02 January 19 22:18 GMT (UK) »
Jon,

Based on an experience that a family member had (in the UK) in 1947, it sounds as though the baby may have been born with hydrocephalus.

In the instance that I was told about many years later it would seem that the baby, a girl, was delivered alive (via a caesarian section) but her head was so monstrously swollen that she was taken into an ante-room - where she was placed in a crib and allowed to die very shortly thereafter.

The mother, who had had a difficult confinement and was not fully aware of what was going on around her, was told that her daughter had been stillborn.

To the best of my knowledge she died never knowing the truth of her daughter's demise.

With this in mind, might it also have been that the mother in the 1934 case that you refer to was similarly advised?

Willyam

Offline LizzieW

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Re: Cause of death on death certificate from 1934
« Reply #17 on: Thursday 03 January 19 12:22 GMT (UK) »
When I was a midwife in the early 1970s it was still the practice to take away stillbirths, or babies who would die soon after birth and the parents did not see their baby and, on most, occasions they did not arrange a funeral either, this was done by the hospital and funeral directors.  Of course, although scans were available at a few hospitals, in practice it was only mothers with real problems who were scanned, so babies with hydrocephalus, anencephalus (which might have been the cause of this particular baby's death and more likely to be called a monstrosity) etc. were not found until their birth.

At the hospital where I worked there were old jars of fetuses preserved in formaldehyde, including hydrocephalus, anencephalus and even more straightforward fetuses, such as 8 week, 12 week etc. miscarriages.  I doubt they are still there today, but we were shown them as a learning aid and also the horrific instruments that were used in the 19th and early 20th centuries.