Author Topic: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?  (Read 969 times)

Offline Rosinish

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #18 on: Monday 07 January 19 15:26 GMT (UK) »
you don't mean in terms of gender  ;D

Not in my own family but I do know of one such where the male is now female although I don't know how things would have been explained etc. & have no wish to know  ;)

Annie
South Uist, Inverness-shire, Scotland:- Bowie, Campbell, Cumming, Currie, MacDonald, MacInnes, MacIntyre, MacKinnon, Steele, Walker

Ireland:- Cullen, Flannigan (Derry), Donahoe/Donaghue (variants) (Cork), McCrate (Tipperary), Mellon, Tol(l)and (Donegal & Tyrone)

Newcastle-on-Tyne/Durham (Northumberland):- Harrison, Jude, Kemp, Lunn, Mellon, Robson, Stirling

Kettering, Northampton:- MacKinnon

Canada:- Callaghan, MacKinnon, MacPhee

"OLD GENEALOGISTS NEVER DIE - THEY JUST LOSE THEIR CENSUS"

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Offline Paulo Leeds

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #19 on: Monday 07 January 19 15:54 GMT (UK) »
you don't mean in terms of gender  ;D

Not in my own family but I do know of one such where the male is now female although I don't know how things would have been explained etc. & have no wish to know  ;)

Annie

so what do you mean by " they wouldn't be able to grasp the difference between gran & grandad (the relationship) on either side" sorry?

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Offline Gillg

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #20 on: Monday 07 January 19 15:55 GMT (UK) »
My grandfather had three cousins who were given full titles - Cousin Sarah, Cousin Gertie and Cousin Annie - whenever they were spoken of, and even spoken to.  They were not closely related to each other, coming from different parts of the family. They signed Christmas cards with these names, too.  These titles were handed down to younger generations, so my mother also referred to them in the same way and down another generation so did my brother and I.  Cousin Annie's daughter signed her cards to us as Cousin Vera.  Just a quaint family custom, I suppose.  Curiously my mother's true cousin was known to us children as Auntie Hilda.
Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

FAIREY/FAIRY/FAREY/FEARY, LAWSON, CHURCH, BENSON, HALSTEAD from Easton, Ellington, Eynesbury, Gt Catworth, Huntingdon, Spaldwick, Hunts;  Burnley, Lancs;  New Zealand, Australia & US.

HURST, BOLTON,  BUTTERWORTH, ADAMSON, WILD, MCIVOR from Milnrow, Newhey, Oldham & Rochdale, Lancs.

Offline JohninSussex

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #21 on: Monday 07 January 19 16:01 GMT (UK) »

so what do you mean by " they wouldn't be able to grasp the difference between gran & grandad (the relationship) on either side" sorry?

Some languages e.g Swedish  distinguish morfar= mother's father from farfar= father's father.  English doesn't which is the difference I assume is being referred to. 

But in a family they might be called "gran and grandpa" and "nanna and poppa" or any other way of differentiation.
Rutter, Sampson, Swinerd, Head, Redman in Kent.  Others in Cheshire, Manchester, Glos/War/Worcs.
RUTTER family and Matilda Sampson's Will:

Offline Paulo Leeds

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #22 on: Monday 07 January 19 16:12 GMT (UK) »

so what do you mean by " they wouldn't be able to grasp the difference between gran & grandad (the relationship) on either side" sorry?

Some languages e.g Swedish  distinguish morfar= mother's father from farfar= father's father.  English doesn't which is the difference I assume is being referred to. 

But in a family they might be called "gran and grandpa" and "nanna and poppa" or any other way of differentiation.

we used the surname

Online heywood

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #23 on: Monday 07 January 19 16:12 GMT (UK) »
Thankyou guys, anyway my main point was that until a person is old enough to understand and differentiate between a blood relative to a none-blood relative they may not realise an Uncle and Uncle-in-law is different

This is all becoming a bit pedantic.
You would be talking about very young children here. Part of family life is discovering and explaining relationships through light hearted activities. It used to be looking at photo albums etc but children soon know whose mum and dad their grandparents are. Most families talk and explain.
When it comes to more distant relatives - either in terms of relationship or geography then that could be more complicated.
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline Rosinish

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #24 on: Monday 07 January 19 16:36 GMT (UK) »
You would be talking about very young children here. Part of family life is discovering and explaining relationships through light hearted activities. It used to be looking at photo albums etc but children soon know whose mum and dad their grandparents are. Most families talk and explain.
When it comes to more distant relatives - either in terms of relationship or geography then that could be more complicated.

Thank you Heywood...perfectly put!

Moderator edit: comment removed. Inappropriate.

Annie

South Uist, Inverness-shire, Scotland:- Bowie, Campbell, Cumming, Currie, MacDonald, MacInnes, MacIntyre, MacKinnon, Steele, Walker

Ireland:- Cullen, Flannigan (Derry), Donahoe/Donaghue (variants) (Cork), McCrate (Tipperary), Mellon, Tol(l)and (Donegal & Tyrone)

Newcastle-on-Tyne/Durham (Northumberland):- Harrison, Jude, Kemp, Lunn, Mellon, Robson, Stirling

Kettering, Northampton:- MacKinnon

Canada:- Callaghan, MacKinnon, MacPhee

"OLD GENEALOGISTS NEVER DIE - THEY JUST LOSE THEIR CENSUS"

Offline Sloe Gin

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #25 on: Monday 07 January 19 16:45 GMT (UK) »
There's no distinction of siblings-in-law.  Always ambiguous unless you know the context.
Brother-in-law can be the husband of someone's sister, or the brother of their husband.
Sister-in-law can be the wife of someone's brother, or the sister of their wife.

I will say here that the use of "aunty" or "auntie" always grates on me when someone is referring to their aunt.  It's fine when used with the name ("I'll ask Auntie Jane" or "Happy birthday, Aunty Liz!" but it seems rather childish to say eg "My aunty would know" instead of "My aunt would know".  There's no such issue with "uncle".

UK census content is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk  Transcriptions are my own.

Online Maiden Stone

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Re: Why do we say Uncle, rather than Uncle-in-law?
« Reply #26 on: Monday 07 January 19 17:55 GMT (UK) »
you don't mean in terms of gender  ;D

Not in my own family but I do know of one such where the male is now female although I don't know how things would have been explained etc. & have no wish to know  ;)

Annie
A topic on "Woman's Hour" this week. BBC Radio Four, 10 a.m. Tomorrow's edition,  point of view of  wife of a person who has transitioned will be heard.