Author Topic: When to go to hospital  (Read 2440 times)

Offline bykerlads

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,177
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
When to go to hospital
« on: Friday 17 April 20 19:18 BST (UK) »
With ref the Virus, I am a bit concerned that the official  online and 111 screening/advice process in the Uk is too severe, perhaps with the original, justifiable intention of trying to avoid floods of folk going to hospital for treatment.
If, as we are told,  there are currently many empty ICU/Nightingale beds, at the same time as too many deaths, surely it implies that ill people are being put off going to hospital until they are too ill to be saved.
Certainly, in my household we will be seeking hospitalisation earlier rather than later, should we show symptoms of Corvid 19.

Offline Pheno

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,477
    • View Profile
Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #1 on: Friday 17 April 20 19:27 BST (UK) »
I can only speak in relation to my daughter who rang 111 when her temperature reached the mid 39 degrees to which the response was - no admittance to hospital until your temperature is in the mid 40's.

It didn't actually get to 40 and she was fine after a few days.

Pheno
Austin/Austen - Sussex & London
Bond - Berkshire & London
Bishop - Sussex & Kent
Holland - Essex
Nevitt - Cheshire & Staffordshire
Wray - Yorkshire

Offline sugarfizzle

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,466
    • View Profile
Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #2 on: Friday 17 April 20 19:39 BST (UK) »
As far as I can gather, most cases start the same way, relatively mildly. After a few days/a week or so, you realise that things are not getting better, or perhaps a sudden deterioration. Then admission to hospital, assess and treat for a few days. Increasing amounts of oxygen failing to increase oxygen saturation levels - bipap/cpap. Still no improvement - transfer to ITU for ventilation.

Then a week or maybe longer on a ventilator, then slow recovery, or unfortunately death.

I wouldn't want to go to hospital, but I would be off like a shot, especially if I was having difficulty in breathing. The official reason why there are still empty beds is that social distancing is working, rather than that people are being admitted too late.

Regards Margaret
STEER, mainly Surrey, Kent; PINNOCKS/HAINES, Gosport, Hants; BARKER, mainly Broadwater, Sussex; Gosport, Hampshire; LAVERSUCH, Micheldever, Hampshire; WESTALL, London, Reading, Berks; HYDE, Croydon, Surrey; BRIGDEN, Hadlow, Kent and London; TUTHILL/STEPHENS, London
WILKINSON, Leeds, Yorkshire and Liverpool; WILLIAMSON, Liverpool; BEARE, Yeovil, Somerset; ALLEN, Kent and London; GORST, Liverpool; HOYLE, mainly Leeds, Yorkshire

Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.go


Offline bykerlads

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,177
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #3 on: Friday 17 April 20 19:51 BST (UK) »
I think that if one is ill especially with fever and breathing difficulties, you are potentially  incapable of ensuring your own welfare. You need someone there at home with you who is capable of assessing your condition and insisting that you are given expert  treatment.
My personal, limited experience of being ill with fever and infection is that it takes away half of your brains/ intellegence/awareness/ability to analyse.
My advice to anyone would be, if in doubt, to insist on hospital, Stand your ground. Don't be fobbed off.
Our nhs staff are experts. Use them.

Offline aghadowey

  • RootsChat Honorary
  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 48,291
    • View Profile
Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #4 on: Friday 17 April 20 21:53 BST (UK) »
I don't think you can "insist on hospital" especially at the moment. Yes, there are empty beds prepared for virus patients but they also need adequate staff to deliver patient care.
My daughter's asthmatic neighbour who lives alone had coronavirus and developed breathing problems. He rang the 111 number and just was told to stay at home and only ring if much, much worse.
Away sorting out DNA matches... I may be gone for some time many years!

Offline bykerlads

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,177
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #5 on: Friday 17 April 20 22:18 BST (UK) »
Really chilling and frightening  to hear that potentially fatal delay is being recommended or rather ruled upon by  111operatives on the basis of a verbal account from a very ill and weakened patient.
Can anyone tell us how we should go about getting hospital (ie life-saving) treatment for corvid. Surely we can ring 999 or go to a hospital?

Offline sugarfizzle

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,466
    • View Profile
Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 18 April 20 06:24 BST (UK) »
If you are having a heart attack or stroke, the advice isn't to ring 111.

You ring 999 and go immediately to hospital.

An asthmatic patient could be having a severe attack, completely unrelated to coronavirus. If they delay treatment by talking to someone at the end of a phone, they could die with status athmaticus.

Paramedics and hospital staff should by now assume that every patient has coronavirus, whether or not that is their initial presentation, and take appropriate precautions.

On that basis, why ring 111 for advice if suffering severe breathing difficulties due to suspected coronavirus?

Ring 999 or go to A and E.

It is up to properly trained paramedics or hospital staff to assess you, not someone at the end of a phone line.

May not be official advice, but is something I would consider if I or a family member was having extreme difficulties with breathing.

Regards Margaret
STEER, mainly Surrey, Kent; PINNOCKS/HAINES, Gosport, Hants; BARKER, mainly Broadwater, Sussex; Gosport, Hampshire; LAVERSUCH, Micheldever, Hampshire; WESTALL, London, Reading, Berks; HYDE, Croydon, Surrey; BRIGDEN, Hadlow, Kent and London; TUTHILL/STEPHENS, London
WILKINSON, Leeds, Yorkshire and Liverpool; WILLIAMSON, Liverpool; BEARE, Yeovil, Somerset; ALLEN, Kent and London; GORST, Liverpool; HOYLE, mainly Leeds, Yorkshire

Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.go

Offline jc26red

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 5,012
  • Census information Crown Copyright.
    • View Profile
Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 18 April 20 09:47 BST (UK) »
It is quite hard to get through to 111 at the moment.

My 91 year old dad has had the virus and they couldnít get through on 111 when his breathing started to get bad. The following day, he phoned his local surgery and his GP called back. His advice was to stay at home as his temperature was coming down by then  (day 14) but ring again if his breathing got worse. He certainly sounded very raspy and catching his breath on the phone. It was very frightening.
Thankfully, my dad has recovered... tough old stick!
My brother was with him the whole time and giving him extra vit C and any vit D foods and when the weather improved he sat outside as much as possible.

If your breathing gets worse after ringing 111 or your GP, then ring 999. Do not go to A&E, you will be spreading the virus to possibly vulnerable people!

Check your local hospitalís website for instructions in your area. My husband has to go for treatment at Basingstoke hospital and they have set up a separate entrance for all COVID patients.  4 weeks ago my husbandís treatment was inside the main building, now oncology have taken over the private suite located in another building to distance cancer patients who need regular treatment.

If you are isolating at home and following the rules then the chances of getting the virus is greatly diminished.

Stay safe, donít watch too much news and avoid the ridiculously alarming fake news in certain newspapers.



Please acknowledge when a restorer works on your photos, it can take hours for them to work their magic

Please scan at 300dpi minimum to help save the restorers eyesight.

Offline Crumblie

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 490
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #8 on: Saturday 18 April 20 10:18 BST (UK) »
I wonder what 111 says if like me you do not have a thermometer.