Author Topic: Mother & daughter DNA  (Read 401 times)

Offline Kessa

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Mother & daughter DNA
« on: Friday 31 July 20 05:26 BST (UK) »
Hi
My husband has Ancestry DNA shared matches with a lady and her daughter.  The daughter shares more DNA with my husband than the mother does.  The mother shares 35 cM and the daughter 39 cM. 
Would someone explain to me please how this can be?
Thank you
Alexander, Edwards, Rutledge, Parker, Wood, Orchard, Henwood, Craig of Australia

Offline medpat

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Re: Mother & daughter DNA
« Reply #1 on: Friday 31 July 20 07:33 BST (UK) »
Her father could be related as well so receiving from both parents.

My daughter has more Neanderthal DNA than either my husband or myself so she has obviously got some from both of us.
GEDmatch M157477

Offline pharmaT

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Re: Mother & daughter DNA
« Reply #2 on: Friday 31 July 20 09:41 BST (UK) »
I have been going through DNA matches the past few days.  I have found my daughter has a few matches that she shares with my Mum but not with me which I don't understand.
Campbell, Dunn, Dickson, Fell, Forest, Norie, Pratt, Somerville, Thompson, Tyler among others


Offline IgorStrav

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Re: Mother & daughter DNA
« Reply #3 on: Friday 31 July 20 09:53 BST (UK) »
I have been going through DNA matches the past few days.  I have found my daughter has a few matches that she shares with my Mum but not with me which I don't understand.

isn't that just to do with the way that the DNA passes down?

so half from father and half from mother

the half from the father may be 75% his mother and 25% his father (or vice versa), or 90/10 or 20/80, and the mother's equally varied.

So as you pass down the generations, the amount of 'shared' DNA will vary with matches, and even matches' close relatives (depending on how much they got each from their parents)

I have a well-documented 2nd cousin once removed, with whom I only share 17cM, 2 segments.

This is very much an outlier on DNA painter, and Ancestry suggests he might be 5th-8th cousin.

But the sharing of the DNA in our particular relationship demonstrates the difficulty of laying down very firm guidelines, especially when you are dealing with comparatively small shares.



Pay, Kent. 
Barham, Kent. 
Cork(e), Kent. 
Cooley, Kent.
Barwell, Rutland/Northants/Greenwich.
Cotterill, Derbys.
Van Steenhoven/Steenhoven/Hoven, Belgium/East London.
Burton, East London.
Barlow, East London
Wayling, East London
Wade, Greenwich/Brightlingsea, Essex.
Thorpe, Brightlingsea, Essex

Offline pharmaT

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Re: Mother & daughter DNA
« Reply #4 on: Friday 31 July 20 10:04 BST (UK) »
Yes but how does DNA from my Mum get to my daughter without going through me?  My Mum doesn't have any links DNA wise or on paper that I can see.
Campbell, Dunn, Dickson, Fell, Forest, Norie, Pratt, Somerville, Thompson, Tyler among others

Offline IgorStrav

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Re: Mother & daughter DNA
« Reply #5 on: Friday 31 July 20 10:06 BST (UK) »
Yes but how does DNA from my Mum get to my daughter without going through me?  My Mum doesn't have any links DNA wise or on paper that I can see.

Sorry, yes - you make a good point, Pharma.

I have no idea and wait for someone to come and explain  ???
Pay, Kent. 
Barham, Kent. 
Cork(e), Kent. 
Cooley, Kent.
Barwell, Rutland/Northants/Greenwich.
Cotterill, Derbys.
Van Steenhoven/Steenhoven/Hoven, Belgium/East London.
Burton, East London.
Barlow, East London
Wayling, East London
Wade, Greenwich/Brightlingsea, Essex.
Thorpe, Brightlingsea, Essex

Offline DianaCanada

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Re: Mother & daughter DNA
« Reply #6 on: Friday 31 July 20 15:24 BST (UK) »
I have the same issue with my daughter.  Her father and I have no common ancestors back to the late 1700ís and even then highly unlikely as he has only one line from Lancashire, only shared county at that point.  A lot of his ancestors left England in the first wave of New England settlement.
Another weird thing...my brother has consistently had at least 50% more 4-6th matches than I do, from the time we tested in Oct 2016, and often considerably higher cM sharing than I do.  I canít rationally explain that one, either!

Offline Romilly

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Re: Mother & daughter DNA
« Reply #7 on: Friday 31 July 20 15:52 BST (UK) »

My late mother, myself and my daughter all tested with Ancestry.com.

My daughter has higher matches than I do to some mutual matches.

I have always assumed that this is due to the random way in which DNA is assigned?

In the same way, my sister matches to people that I donít, and visa versa...

Itís all as clear as mud really!

Romilly  ;D
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Offline pharmaT

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Re: Mother & daughter DNA
« Reply #8 on: Friday 31 July 20 16:28 BST (UK) »

My late mother, myself and my daughter all tested with Ancestry.com.

My daughter has higher matches than I do to some mutual matches.

I have always assumed that this is due to the random way in which DNA is assigned?

In the same way, my sister matches to people that I donít, and visa versa...

Itís all as clear as mud really!

Romilly  ;D

You see a sibling having different matches makes perfect sense in my head as you won't inherit the exact same 50% from each parent. It's my daughter and my mum matching someone (the paperwork looks good for a real match) but me not matching confuses me.  My Mum's family and her Dad's family come from completely different areas of the country.
Campbell, Dunn, Dickson, Fell, Forest, Norie, Pratt, Somerville, Thompson, Tyler among others