Author Topic: Origins of the slang word Pikey  (Read 23834 times)

Offline wheeldon

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Origins of the slang word Pikey
« on: Friday 15 September 06 14:19 BST (UK) »
I was interested to know where this term came from.

I'm not including it in order to be offensive but thought people maybe interested.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pikey
Wheeldon  Derbyshire & Manchester
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Offline An65

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #1 on: Friday 15 September 06 16:06 BST (UK) »
Piki is a word in the Rom language, meaning someone of diluted bloodstock.

a "Black Blood" was a full blooded Romany, whereas a "posh-rat" was half blood. Piki was someone who was of more diluted bloodstock, and Gorja/Gaja was non-Rom.

Offline An65

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #2 on: Friday 15 September 06 16:08 BST (UK) »
Also, its interesting how many Romany words have become general slang terms.

Chav/Chavvie is merely a word for a child, in Romany.

Choring is stealing

Kushti is good.



Offline wheeldon

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #3 on: Friday 15 September 06 16:44 BST (UK) »
Many thanks An for the explanation  :)

Here in Manchester most people/or the people that I know refer to travelers as Piki.  So, I wanted to know where the term had come from.

My friend's dad allegedly comes from a long line of travellers (she doesn't really get along with him and sees him very rarely) but she often refers to him as a full blooded piki, which I understand now is a contradiction but she quite possibly has the terminology wrong.

My friend is interested in starting a family tree and has asked for my help but first I'm going to get myself clued up on Romany/Travellers sources.

Many thanks again for your time

Fiona  :)


Wheeldon  Derbyshire & Manchester
Willshaw Staffordshire & Manchester
Wilshaw Staffordshire & Manchester
Pugh Manchester, Haston, Hadwell, Shrewsbury, Shropshire
Patrick Coventry, Warwick, Foleshill
Kelly Dronmore County Down & Manchester
Stewart  Hilsborough County Down & Manchester
Moffatt/Moffitt County May &, Lancashire

Offline wheeldon

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #4 on: Friday 15 September 06 16:49 BST (UK) »
Ooooh and I apologise for the many ignorant/stupid questions that, no doubt, I'm going to post in the future  ::) :-[ ???
Wheeldon  Derbyshire & Manchester
Willshaw Staffordshire & Manchester
Wilshaw Staffordshire & Manchester
Pugh Manchester, Haston, Hadwell, Shrewsbury, Shropshire
Patrick Coventry, Warwick, Foleshill
Kelly Dronmore County Down & Manchester
Stewart  Hilsborough County Down & Manchester
Moffatt/Moffitt County May &, Lancashire

Offline An65

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #5 on: Friday 15 September 06 17:25 BST (UK) »
hey dont worry about it. its all part of the fun!!

Offline boggabarrett

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 16 September 06 01:40 BST (UK) »
Having known and grown up with a lot of Rom in my childhood I was always under the impression that  Piki was a posh rat with either a mother or father as the Rom and a Didikoi had the other parent as a Rom, never could remember which.
Steggel:- Kent, Essex, Newcastle upon Tyne, Norfolk.

Barrett:- Kent, Essex, Ireland

Raymes:-Norfolk, Essex, New South Wales

Ainger:- Essex, Kent

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Offline wheeldon

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 16 September 06 19:24 BST (UK) »
Well, boggabarrett this is all news/new to me.

I'll keep reading as I want to know as much as I can before helping my mate with her research as I'm inclined to think that it will be me doing all the research  ::)

If I come up with any good sites then I will add them as I go along.

Just a quick question - were boatmen classed as travellers?

Many thanks

Fiona



Wheeldon  Derbyshire & Manchester
Willshaw Staffordshire & Manchester
Wilshaw Staffordshire & Manchester
Pugh Manchester, Haston, Hadwell, Shrewsbury, Shropshire
Patrick Coventry, Warwick, Foleshill
Kelly Dronmore County Down & Manchester
Stewart  Hilsborough County Down & Manchester
Moffatt/Moffitt County May &, Lancashire

Offline meles

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Re: Origins of the slang word Pikey
« Reply #8 on: Saturday 16 September 06 19:39 BST (UK) »
I think they were - Philip Pullman's Trilogy "His Dark Materials" has "Gyptians" (ie Romanies) working on narrow boats in an alternative England.

meles
Brock: Alburgh, Norfolk, and after 1850, London; Tooley: Norfolk<br />Grimmer: Norfolk; Grimson: Norfolk<br />Harrison: London; Pollock<br />Dixon: Hampshire; Collins: Middx<br />Jeary: Norfolk; Davison: Norfolk<br />Rogers: London; Bartlett: London<br />Drew: Kent; Alden: Hants<br />Gamble: Yorkshire; Huntingford: East London

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